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Prepregnancy Body Mass Index and Gestational Weight Gain and Their Association with Some Pregnancy Outcomes

AUTHORS

Z Yazdanpanahi 1 , S Forouhari 2 , * , ME Parsanezhad 1

AUTHORS INFORMATION

1 Hazrat fatemeh School of Nursing and Midwifery, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Fars, Iran

2 Hazrat Fatemeh School of Nursing and Midwifery, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, forouharism@yahoo.com, Fars, Iran

ARTICLE INFORMATION

Iranian Red Crescent Medical Journal: 10 (4); 326-331
Article Type: Brief Report
Received: February 4, 2008
Accepted: May 18, 2008

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Abstract

Background: Weight gain during pregnancy for women with normal Body Mass Index (BMI) before pregnancy has been reported to be 11.5–16.0 Kg/m2 by IOM and supported by several authors. This study was carried out to determine the relationship between pre-pregnancy BMI and gestational weight gain and pregnancy outcome.

 

Methods: In 476 pregnant women, BMI was categorized and weight gain was divided into less than normal and higher than normal groups based on Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommendations.

 

Results: Women with normal weight gain had better pregnancy outcomes. The incidence of low birth weight was higher among underweight women and those with low gestational weight gain. Overweight women and those with high gestational weight gain had a higher rate of cesarean delivery and postpartum hemorrhage. There was also a significant difference between the BMI early postpartum hemorrhage, method of delivery, neonatal weight, nausea, vomiting and weight gain during pregnancy. Women gained weight according to recommendations had good pregnancy outcome in relation to weight, lengths and head chest circumferences of the neonate and methods of delivery and post partum hemorrhage. 

 

Conclusion: The findings presented here indicate that prenatal care providers should consider women with abnormal prepregnancy BMI and gestational weight gain at an increased risk unconditionally and that they need special care to avoid the pregnancy-associated complications forthwith.

Keywords

Pregnancy Body mass index Weight gain BMI

© 0, Author(s). This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits copy and redistribute the material just in noncommercial usages, provided the original work is properly cited.
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