Iranian Red Crescent Medical Journal Iranian Red Crescent Medical Journal Iran Red Crescent Med J http://www.ircmj.com 2074-1804 2074-1812 10.5812/ircmj en jalali 2017 6 28 gregorian 2017 6 28 18 9
en 28180021 10.5812/ircmj.31146 The Relationship Between Coronary Artery Disease and Genetic Polymorphisms of Melanoma Inhibitory Activity 3 The Relationship Between Coronary Artery Disease and Genetic Polymorphisms of Melanoma Inhibitory Activity 3 research-article research-article Materials and Methods

Genotyping of the MIA3 gene was undertaken using TaqMan real-time PCR in all subjects. Anthropometric and biochemical features, including HDL, LDL, and TG were assessed in all subjects.

Results

The CAD patients had significantly (P < 0.05) higher BMI and significantly higher levels of TG, LDL, SBP, and DBP, while the level of HDL was lower compared to that of the control group. the MIA3 gene polymorphism was not associated with CAD in our population sample.

Background

Melanoma Inhibitory Activity 3 regulates the plasma level of LDL cholesterol. The c.3169 + 315G > A single-nucleotide polymorphism of the MIA3 gene has been reported to be associated with serum coronary artery disease (CAD). However, there have been no studies analyzing the association of this polymorphism with CAD in Iranian individuals with CAD.

Conclusions

The MIA3 polymorphism is unlikely to play an important role in CAD in the Iranian population. However, further studies are needed in a larger population to confirm this.

Objectives

Therefore, in the present study we have investigated the potential protective effect of the rs3008621 MIA3 polymorphism in 188 subjects with and without CAD.

Materials and Methods

Genotyping of the MIA3 gene was undertaken using TaqMan real-time PCR in all subjects. Anthropometric and biochemical features, including HDL, LDL, and TG were assessed in all subjects.

Results

The CAD patients had significantly (P < 0.05) higher BMI and significantly higher levels of TG, LDL, SBP, and DBP, while the level of HDL was lower compared to that of the control group. the MIA3 gene polymorphism was not associated with CAD in our population sample.

Background

Melanoma Inhibitory Activity 3 regulates the plasma level of LDL cholesterol. The c.3169 + 315G > A single-nucleotide polymorphism of the MIA3 gene has been reported to be associated with serum coronary artery disease (CAD). However, there have been no studies analyzing the association of this polymorphism with CAD in Iranian individuals with CAD.

Conclusions

The MIA3 polymorphism is unlikely to play an important role in CAD in the Iranian population. However, further studies are needed in a larger population to confirm this.

Objectives

Therefore, in the present study we have investigated the potential protective effect of the rs3008621 MIA3 polymorphism in 188 subjects with and without CAD.

Proprotein Convertase Subtilisin/Kexin Type 9;Polymorphism;Coronary Artery Disease Proprotein Convertase Subtilisin/Kexin Type 9;Polymorphism;Coronary Artery Disease http://www.ircmj.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=31146 Hooshang Zaimkohan Hooshang Zaimkohan Department of Medical Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Department of Medical Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Mohammad Keramatipour Mohammad Keramatipour Department of Medical Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Department of Medical Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Seyed Reza Mirhafez Seyed Reza Mirhafez Metabolic Syndrome Research Center, School of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran Metabolic Syndrome Research Center, School of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran Javad Tavakkoly-Bazzaz Javad Tavakkoly-Bazzaz Department of Medical Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Department of Medical Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Azadeh Tahooni Azadeh Tahooni Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Mohammad Piryaei Mohammad Piryaei Department of Medical Genetics, School of Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Department of Medical Genetics, School of Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Majid Ghayour-Mobarhan Majid Ghayour-Mobarhan Metabolic Syndrome Research Center, School of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran; Corresponding Authors: Majid Ghayour-Mobarhan, Department of Modern Sciences and Technologies, Biochemistry of Nutrition Research Center, School of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, IR Iran. Tel: +98-5118002288, Fax: +98-5118002287, E-mail:; Seyed Mohammad Hossein Ghaderian, Department of Medical Genetics, School of Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran. Tel: +98-2123872572, Fax: +98-5118002287, E-mail: Metabolic Syndrome Research Center, School of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran; Corresponding Authors: Majid Ghayour-Mobarhan, Department of Modern Sciences and Technologies, Biochemistry of Nutrition Research Center, School of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, IR Iran. Tel: +98-5118002288, Fax: +98-5118002287, E-mail:; Seyed Mohammad Hossein Ghaderian, Department of Medical Genetics, School of Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran. Tel: +98-2123872572, Fax: +98-5118002287, E-mail: Seyed Mohammad Hossein Ghaderian Seyed Mohammad Hossein Ghaderian Department of Medical Genetics, School of Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Corresponding Authors: Majid Ghayour-Mobarhan, Department of Modern Sciences and Technologies, Biochemistry of Nutrition Research Center, School of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, IR Iran. Tel: +98-5118002288, Fax: +98-5118002287, E-mail:; Seyed Mohammad Hossein Ghaderian, Department of Medical Genetics, School of Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran. Tel: +98-2123872572, Fax: +98-5118002287, E-mail: Department of Medical Genetics, School of Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Corresponding Authors: Majid Ghayour-Mobarhan, Department of Modern Sciences and Technologies, Biochemistry of Nutrition Research Center, School of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, IR Iran. Tel: +98-5118002288, Fax: +98-5118002287, E-mail:; Seyed Mohammad Hossein Ghaderian, Department of Medical Genetics, School of Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran. Tel: +98-2123872572, Fax: +98-5118002287, E-mail:
en 28144453 10.5812/ircmj.25995 The Association Between C424c/A Polymorphism Within the IL-25 Gene and Multiple Sclerosis The Association Between C424c/A Polymorphism Within the IL-25 Gene and Multiple Sclerosis research-article research-article Results

The results showed that there was no statistical significant difference in distribution of genotype (AA, AC and CC) and allele (A and C) frequencies between MS patients and healthy controls (P = 0.901 and P = 0.728, respectively).

Conclusions

In conclusion, it appears that the c424C/A polymorphism within the IL-25 gene has no significant relationship with MS, and this polymorphism is probably not associated with MS complications, its onset and gender distribution.

Objectives

The aim of this study was to investigate the c424C/A polymorphism within the IL-25 gene in MS patients in comparison to healthy controls.

Patients and Methods

In this case-control study, 74 patients with MS and 75 healthy controls were selected. Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was used in order to determine c424C/A polymorphism within the IL-25 gene.

Background

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a common autoimmune system disease which affects the central nervous system. It has been documented that interleukin-25 (IL-25) plays key roles in suppressing Th1 responses, which is increased during MS.

Results

The results showed that there was no statistical significant difference in distribution of genotype (AA, AC and CC) and allele (A and C) frequencies between MS patients and healthy controls (P = 0.901 and P = 0.728, respectively).

Conclusions

In conclusion, it appears that the c424C/A polymorphism within the IL-25 gene has no significant relationship with MS, and this polymorphism is probably not associated with MS complications, its onset and gender distribution.

Objectives

The aim of this study was to investigate the c424C/A polymorphism within the IL-25 gene in MS patients in comparison to healthy controls.

Patients and Methods

In this case-control study, 74 patients with MS and 75 healthy controls were selected. Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was used in order to determine c424C/A polymorphism within the IL-25 gene.

Background

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a common autoimmune system disease which affects the central nervous system. It has been documented that interleukin-25 (IL-25) plays key roles in suppressing Th1 responses, which is increased during MS.

Multiple Sclerosis;Polymorphism;Genetic;CCL25 Multiple Sclerosis;Polymorphism;Genetic;CCL25 http://www.ircmj.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=25995 Lida Zare Lida Zare Physiology Pharmacology Research Center, Rafsanjan University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, IR Iran Physiology Pharmacology Research Center, Rafsanjan University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, IR Iran Mahmood Sheikh Fathollahi Mahmood Sheikh Fathollahi Department of Social Medicine, Medical School Research Center, Rafsanjan University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, IR Iran Department of Social Medicine, Medical School Research Center, Rafsanjan University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, IR Iran Mohammad Kazemi Arababadi Mohammad Kazemi Arababadi Immunology of Infectious Diseases Research Center, Rafsanjan University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, IR Iran Immunology of Infectious Diseases Research Center, Rafsanjan University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, IR Iran Ali Shamsizadeh Ali Shamsizadeh Department of Neurosurgery, Alborz Hospital, Karaj, IR Iran Department of Neurosurgery, Alborz Hospital, Karaj, IR Iran Behnam Daneshpajouh Behnam Daneshpajouh Department of Neurosurgery, Alborz Hospital, Karaj, IR Iran Department of Neurosurgery, Alborz Hospital, Karaj, IR Iran Nahid Zainodini Nahid Zainodini Immunology of Infectious Diseases Research Center, Rafsanjan University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, IR Iran Immunology of Infectious Diseases Research Center, Rafsanjan University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, IR Iran Mohammad Allahtavakoli Mohammad Allahtavakoli Physiology Pharmacology Research Center, Rafsanjan University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, IR Iran; Physiology Pharmacology Research Center, Rafsanjan University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, IR Iran. Tel: +98-3915229171, Fax: +98-3431315003 Physiology Pharmacology Research Center, Rafsanjan University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, IR Iran; Physiology Pharmacology Research Center, Rafsanjan University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, IR Iran. Tel: +98-3915229171, Fax: +98-3431315003
en 28144468 10.5812/ircmj.40844 Necessity for Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Screening in Pregnant Females in Iran Necessity for Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Screening in Pregnant Females in Iran editorial editorial Hepatitis B;Pregnancy;Screening Hepatitis B;Pregnancy;Screening http://www.ircmj.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=40844 Seyed Moayed Alavian Seyed Moayed Alavian Baqiyatallah Research Center for Gastroenterology and Liver Diseases, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Baqiyatallah Research Center for Gastroenterology and Liver Diseases, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Elham Ebrahimi Elham Ebrahimi Student Research Committee, Department of Reproductive Health, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Shahroud University of Medical Sciences, Shahroud, IR Iran; School of Nursing and Midwifery, Hafte Teer Square, Shahroud, IR Iran. Tel: +98-2333395054 Student Research Committee, Department of Reproductive Health, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Shahroud University of Medical Sciences, Shahroud, IR Iran; School of Nursing and Midwifery, Hafte Teer Square, Shahroud, IR Iran. Tel: +98-2333395054 Mehrandokht Abedini Mehrandokht Abedini Department of Family Health, Ministry of Health and Medical Education, Tehran, IR Iran Department of Family Health, Ministry of Health and Medical Education, Tehran, IR Iran
en 28144449 10.5812/ircmj.18570 Intermediate-Risk Chronic Stable Angina: Neutrophil-Lymphocyte Ratio and Fibrinogen Levels Improved Predicting Angiographically-Detected Coronary Artery Disease Intermediate-Risk Chronic Stable Angina: Neutrophil-Lymphocyte Ratio and Fibrinogen Levels Improved Predicting Angiographically-Detected Coronary Artery Disease research-article research-article Background

Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. Research indicates that coronary atherosclerosis is the most frequent cause of CHD. Evidence is scarce concerning the clinical efficacy of fibrinogen or neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) measurement in risk-stratifying patients with chronic stable angina.

Conclusions

NLR and fibrinogen predicted CAD, independent of traditional CAD risk factors. Both measures (whether separately or together) substantially enhanced the predictive performance of traditional risk factors for identifying patients with CAD.

Results

The mean age of the participants was 57.5, with 51.9% being male. Only 12% of participants had angiographically-determined patent coronary arteries. The number of participants with one, two, and three-vessel stenosis were 76, 31, 31, respectively, while 45 did not have stenosed vessels. NLR and fibrinogen levels were significantly higher in patients with stenosis in two (2.4 and 512 mg.dL-1) or three (2.6 and 517 mg.dL-1) coronary arteries, as compared to the group of patients with no significant involvement (2 and 430 mg.dL-1) (all P < 0.01). Patients with a higher NLR and a higher fibrinogen levels were more likely to have higher grades of CAD. OR log-NLR = 1.36 (95% CI: 1.05 - 1.94) and OR Z-Fibrinogen = 1.61 (95% CI: 1.18 - 2.22). When NLR and fibrinogen were added to the traditional risk factors separately, the NRIs were 0.170 (0.023 - 0.324) and 0.380 (0.214 - 0.543), respectively. The NRI was 0.460 (0.303 - 0.620) when both NLR and fibrinogen added to traditional risk factors simultaneously.

Patients and Methods

In this cross-sectional study, angiography was performed for 183 Iranian patients with chronic stable angina with exercise ECG-determined intermediate risk. Generalized estimated equations were used to obtain the odd ratio (OR) of CAD for a 1-unit increase in log-NLR and a 1-SD increase in plasma fibrinogen. Models were adjusted for established CAD risk factors. Integrated discriminatory improvement index (IDI) and net reclassification improvement index (NRI) were used as measures of predictive ability for CAD, combined with traditional risk factors by NLR and fibrinogen.

Objectives

To examine the independent and incremental prognostic value of fibrinogen and neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) for angiographically-detected coronary artery disease (CAD).

Background

Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. Research indicates that coronary atherosclerosis is the most frequent cause of CHD. Evidence is scarce concerning the clinical efficacy of fibrinogen or neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) measurement in risk-stratifying patients with chronic stable angina.

Conclusions

NLR and fibrinogen predicted CAD, independent of traditional CAD risk factors. Both measures (whether separately or together) substantially enhanced the predictive performance of traditional risk factors for identifying patients with CAD.

Results

The mean age of the participants was 57.5, with 51.9% being male. Only 12% of participants had angiographically-determined patent coronary arteries. The number of participants with one, two, and three-vessel stenosis were 76, 31, 31, respectively, while 45 did not have stenosed vessels. NLR and fibrinogen levels were significantly higher in patients with stenosis in two (2.4 and 512 mg.dL-1) or three (2.6 and 517 mg.dL-1) coronary arteries, as compared to the group of patients with no significant involvement (2 and 430 mg.dL-1) (all P < 0.01). Patients with a higher NLR and a higher fibrinogen levels were more likely to have higher grades of CAD. OR log-NLR = 1.36 (95% CI: 1.05 - 1.94) and OR Z-Fibrinogen = 1.61 (95% CI: 1.18 - 2.22). When NLR and fibrinogen were added to the traditional risk factors separately, the NRIs were 0.170 (0.023 - 0.324) and 0.380 (0.214 - 0.543), respectively. The NRI was 0.460 (0.303 - 0.620) when both NLR and fibrinogen added to traditional risk factors simultaneously.

Patients and Methods

In this cross-sectional study, angiography was performed for 183 Iranian patients with chronic stable angina with exercise ECG-determined intermediate risk. Generalized estimated equations were used to obtain the odd ratio (OR) of CAD for a 1-unit increase in log-NLR and a 1-SD increase in plasma fibrinogen. Models were adjusted for established CAD risk factors. Integrated discriminatory improvement index (IDI) and net reclassification improvement index (NRI) were used as measures of predictive ability for CAD, combined with traditional risk factors by NLR and fibrinogen.

Objectives

To examine the independent and incremental prognostic value of fibrinogen and neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) for angiographically-detected coronary artery disease (CAD).

Angiography, Atherosclerosis, Fibrinogen, Lymphocyte, Neutrophil Angiography, Atherosclerosis, Fibrinogen, Lymphocyte, Neutrophil http://www.ircmj.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=18570 Habib Haybar Habib Haybar Cardiovascular Research Center, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, IR Iran Cardiovascular Research Center, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, IR Iran Ahmad Ahmadzadeh Ahmad Ahmadzadeh Hematology Ward, Golestan Hospital, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, IR Iran Hematology Ward, Golestan Hospital, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, IR Iran Ahmadreza Assareh Ahmadreza Assareh Cardiovascular Research Center, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, IR Iran Cardiovascular Research Center, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, IR Iran Nader Afshari Nader Afshari Cardiovascular Research Center, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, IR Iran Cardiovascular Research Center, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, IR Iran Mohammadreza Bozorgmanesh Mohammadreza Bozorgmanesh Prevention of Metabolic Disorders Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Prevention of Metabolic Disorders Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Mahdis Vakili Mahdis Vakili Department of Nutrition, Para Medicine School, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, IR Iran; Student Research Committee, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, IR Iran; Department of Nutrition, Para Medicine School, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, IR Iran. Tel: +98-9168300423, Fax: +98-6133375717 Department of Nutrition, Para Medicine School, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, IR Iran; Student Research Committee, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, IR Iran; Department of Nutrition, Para Medicine School, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, IR Iran. Tel: +98-9168300423, Fax: +98-6133375717
en 28144450 10.5812/ircmj.23768 Comparing Zonisamide With Sodium Valproate in the Management of Migraine Headaches: Double-Blind Randomized Clinical Trial of Efficacy and Safety Comparing Zonisamide With Sodium Valproate in the Management of Migraine Headaches: Double-Blind Randomized Clinical Trial of Efficacy and Safety research-article research-article Objectives

This study evaluates the efficacy and safety of zonisamide compared with sodium valproate in the management of migraine headaches.

Patients and Methods

In the current double-blind, parallel, randomized, controlled trial, 96 patients with a migraine diagnosis based on the international headache society (HIS) criteria were selected. They were divided randomly into two groups; the case group was given zonisamide, and sodium valproate was given to a control group. In addition to the side effects of the drugs, the severity, duration, and frequency of migraine attacks were evaluated at baseline and at three months.

Results

The 96 selected patients were divided randomly into two treatment groups (zonisamide n = 48, sodium valproate n = 48). Seven patients were excluded from analysis because of early dropout, leaving 89 (n = 45; n = 44) patients for analysis. While using zonisamide, six (13%) patients complained of fatigue, and two (4%) patients encountered noticeable appetite and weight loss. In the control group, five (11%) patients reported dizziness, and four (9%) patients faced obvious appetite and weight gain. Both drugs were considerably efficient in reducing further attacks. There was no statistically significant correlation between frequency or severity of migraine attacks and the drug used for treatment in three months of follow-up.

Conclusions

Both medications are effective in reducing migraine attacks. It will be important to consider the drugs’ adverse effects and availability and patients’ medical and socioeconomic condition to select the appropriate treatment.

Background

Migraine is one of the most debilitating medical conditions and has a high socioeconomic burden. As conventional therapeutic methods do not entirely alleviate the symptoms, new alternatives are being considered.

Objectives

This study evaluates the efficacy and safety of zonisamide compared with sodium valproate in the management of migraine headaches.

Patients and Methods

In the current double-blind, parallel, randomized, controlled trial, 96 patients with a migraine diagnosis based on the international headache society (HIS) criteria were selected. They were divided randomly into two groups; the case group was given zonisamide, and sodium valproate was given to a control group. In addition to the side effects of the drugs, the severity, duration, and frequency of migraine attacks were evaluated at baseline and at three months.

Results

The 96 selected patients were divided randomly into two treatment groups (zonisamide n = 48, sodium valproate n = 48). Seven patients were excluded from analysis because of early dropout, leaving 89 (n = 45; n = 44) patients for analysis. While using zonisamide, six (13%) patients complained of fatigue, and two (4%) patients encountered noticeable appetite and weight loss. In the control group, five (11%) patients reported dizziness, and four (9%) patients faced obvious appetite and weight gain. Both drugs were considerably efficient in reducing further attacks. There was no statistically significant correlation between frequency or severity of migraine attacks and the drug used for treatment in three months of follow-up.

Conclusions

Both medications are effective in reducing migraine attacks. It will be important to consider the drugs’ adverse effects and availability and patients’ medical and socioeconomic condition to select the appropriate treatment.

Background

Migraine is one of the most debilitating medical conditions and has a high socioeconomic burden. As conventional therapeutic methods do not entirely alleviate the symptoms, new alternatives are being considered.

Zonisamide;Sodium Valproate;Migraine Headaches;RCT Zonisamide;Sodium Valproate;Migraine Headaches;RCT http://www.ircmj.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=23768 Farhad Assarzadegan Farhad Assarzadegan Imam Hossein Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Imam Hossein Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Hanif Tabesh Hanif Tabesh School of Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; School of Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran. Tel: +98-9128147401, Fax: +98-1617763141 School of Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; School of Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran. Tel: +98-9128147401, Fax: +98-1617763141 Seyed-Mostafa Hosseini-Zijoud Seyed-Mostafa Hosseini-Zijoud Nephrology and Urology Research Center, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Nephrology and Urology Research Center, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Andrew David Beale Andrew David Beale Research Complex at Harwell, London, United Kingdom Research Complex at Harwell, London, United Kingdom Arya Shoghli Arya Shoghli School of Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran School of Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Mahmood Ghafoori Yazdi Mahmood Ghafoori Yazdi School of Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran School of Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Behnam Mansouri Behnam Mansouri Imam Hossein Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Imam Hossein Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Omid Hesami Omid Hesami Imam Hossein Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Imam Hossein Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Nahid Beladi Moghadam Nahid Beladi Moghadam Imam Hossein Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Imam Hossein Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Hosein Delavar Kasmaei Hosein Delavar Kasmaei Shohadaye Tajrish Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Shohadaye Tajrish Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran
en 28144451 10.5812/ircmj.25490 Protective Effect of Quinine on Chemical Kindling and Passive Avoidance Test in Rats Protective Effect of Quinine on Chemical Kindling and Passive Avoidance Test in Rats research-article research-article Background

In humans, convulsive diseases such as temporal lobe epilepsy are usually accompanied by learning and memory impairments. In recent years, the role of gap junction channels as an important target of antiepileptic drugs has been studied and discussed. Quinine, as a gap junction blocker of connexin 36, can abolish ictal epileptiform activity in brain slices.

Objectives

The role of quinine in memory retrieval in pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-kindled rats was examined using a step-through passive avoidance task.

Methods

Forty rats were used in this experimental study in groups of 10 animals. Quinine (15, 30, and 60 mg/kg, i.p.) and PTZ (35 mg/kg, i.p.) were injected into the rats before the start of the learning test. Then, retention tests were conducted after the treatments ended.

Results

Quinine could attenuate seizure severity at doses of 15, 30 and 60 mg/kg compared with the control at the beginning of the kindling experiment by lowering the mean seizure stages (P < 0.01, P < 0.001, P < 0.001). Quinine at doses of 15 and 30 mg/kg could significantly increase memory retrieval compared with the control in the retention test 24 and 48 hours after training (P < 0.05). Quinine at a dose of 60 mg/kg increased latency to enter the dark chamber 24 and 48 hours after training (P < 0.001). The results of the retention test one and two weeks after training of quinine were not significant (P > 0.05).

Conclusions

Quinine may decrease the severity of seizure and improve the memory retrieval of animals by inhibiting the gap junction channel. However, further studies are needed to evaluate the molecular mechanism underlying the effects of quinine.

Background

In humans, convulsive diseases such as temporal lobe epilepsy are usually accompanied by learning and memory impairments. In recent years, the role of gap junction channels as an important target of antiepileptic drugs has been studied and discussed. Quinine, as a gap junction blocker of connexin 36, can abolish ictal epileptiform activity in brain slices.

Objectives

The role of quinine in memory retrieval in pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-kindled rats was examined using a step-through passive avoidance task.

Methods

Forty rats were used in this experimental study in groups of 10 animals. Quinine (15, 30, and 60 mg/kg, i.p.) and PTZ (35 mg/kg, i.p.) were injected into the rats before the start of the learning test. Then, retention tests were conducted after the treatments ended.

Results

Quinine could attenuate seizure severity at doses of 15, 30 and 60 mg/kg compared with the control at the beginning of the kindling experiment by lowering the mean seizure stages (P < 0.01, P < 0.001, P < 0.001). Quinine at doses of 15 and 30 mg/kg could significantly increase memory retrieval compared with the control in the retention test 24 and 48 hours after training (P < 0.05). Quinine at a dose of 60 mg/kg increased latency to enter the dark chamber 24 and 48 hours after training (P < 0.001). The results of the retention test one and two weeks after training of quinine were not significant (P > 0.05).

Conclusions

Quinine may decrease the severity of seizure and improve the memory retrieval of animals by inhibiting the gap junction channel. However, further studies are needed to evaluate the molecular mechanism underlying the effects of quinine.

Seizure;Quinine;Pentylenetetrazole;Passive Avoidance Test Seizure;Quinine;Pentylenetetrazole;Passive Avoidance Test http://www.ircmj.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=25490 Zahra Faridkia Zahra Faridkia Department of Education, Qazvin, IR Iran Department of Education, Qazvin, IR Iran Parichehr Yaghmaei Parichehr Yaghmaei Faculty of Science, Department of Biology, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, IR Iran Faculty of Science, Department of Biology, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, IR Iran Marjan Nassiri-Asl Marjan Nassiri-Asl Cellular and Molecular Research Centre, Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran; Cellular and Molecular Research Centre, Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, P. O. Box: 341197598, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran. Tel: +98-2833336001, Fax: +98-2833324970 Cellular and Molecular Research Centre, Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran; Cellular and Molecular Research Centre, Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, P. O. Box: 341197598, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, IR Iran. Tel: +98-2833336001, Fax: +98-2833324970
en 28144452 10.5812/ircmj.25569 Dietary Predictors of Overweight and Obesity in Iranian Adolescents Dietary Predictors of Overweight and Obesity in Iranian Adolescents research-article research-article Conclusions

This study showed significant associations between the seven dietary patterns and overweight and obesity among adolescents. Using dietary patterns within adolescents can provide important information on dietary consumption, and this approach is clearer and much easier to follow.

Patients and Methods

A total of 840 students, ages 15 - 17, from six schools were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. A diet-patterns approach often has been used to describe the eating patterns in adolescents. Height, weight, and waist circumference anthropometric indices, physical activity, waist hip ratio, and BMI measurements were determined. Daily dietary data and weighed food records were collected in 2010 and 2011. Abdominal obesity was defined according to world health organization guidelines, and the relationship between dietary predictor variables and the measures of adiposity were determined by using linear regression. Usual dietary intakes were assessed in an experimental study of Esfahani students.

Results

In total, 38.5% of girls and 32.2% of boys had a Western dietary pattern as the more prevalent pattern. The diet quality of adolescents with the lowest score on each dietary pattern was compared with those recording the highest scores. Those with the Western dietary pattern score were less likely to exercise and had a higher prevalence of general obesity. Adolescents in the greater quartile of the Mediterranean dietary patterns had the lowest odds of being overweight (OR 0.50, 95%; CI 0.27 - 0.73) and obese (OR 0.48, 95%; CI 0.15 - 0.80) than those in the lower quartile, whereas those in the greater quartile of the Western dietary pattern had the highest odds of being overweight (OR 1.69, 95%; CI 1.10 - 2.04) and obese (OR 1.44, 95% CI 1.05 - 1.84). Higher consumption of a Western dietary pattern and a salty dietary pattern were associated significantly with obesity (P < 0.05). Intake of a Western dietary pattern and a salty–sweet dietary pattern were associated positively with measures of adiposity, namely body mass index and waist circumference.

Background

Considering both diet and energy expenditures possess some influence on weight status, research into dietary determinants of obesity is challenging but essential to rational planning of well-organized interventions to avoid obesity.

Objectives

This study aimed to determine whether dietary factors were predictive of overweight and obesity in adolescents in the Iranian population.

Conclusions

This study showed significant associations between the seven dietary patterns and overweight and obesity among adolescents. Using dietary patterns within adolescents can provide important information on dietary consumption, and this approach is clearer and much easier to follow.

Patients and Methods

A total of 840 students, ages 15 - 17, from six schools were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. A diet-patterns approach often has been used to describe the eating patterns in adolescents. Height, weight, and waist circumference anthropometric indices, physical activity, waist hip ratio, and BMI measurements were determined. Daily dietary data and weighed food records were collected in 2010 and 2011. Abdominal obesity was defined according to world health organization guidelines, and the relationship between dietary predictor variables and the measures of adiposity were determined by using linear regression. Usual dietary intakes were assessed in an experimental study of Esfahani students.

Results

In total, 38.5% of girls and 32.2% of boys had a Western dietary pattern as the more prevalent pattern. The diet quality of adolescents with the lowest score on each dietary pattern was compared with those recording the highest scores. Those with the Western dietary pattern score were less likely to exercise and had a higher prevalence of general obesity. Adolescents in the greater quartile of the Mediterranean dietary patterns had the lowest odds of being overweight (OR 0.50, 95%; CI 0.27 - 0.73) and obese (OR 0.48, 95%; CI 0.15 - 0.80) than those in the lower quartile, whereas those in the greater quartile of the Western dietary pattern had the highest odds of being overweight (OR 1.69, 95%; CI 1.10 - 2.04) and obese (OR 1.44, 95% CI 1.05 - 1.84). Higher consumption of a Western dietary pattern and a salty dietary pattern were associated significantly with obesity (P < 0.05). Intake of a Western dietary pattern and a salty–sweet dietary pattern were associated positively with measures of adiposity, namely body mass index and waist circumference.

Background

Considering both diet and energy expenditures possess some influence on weight status, research into dietary determinants of obesity is challenging but essential to rational planning of well-organized interventions to avoid obesity.

Objectives

This study aimed to determine whether dietary factors were predictive of overweight and obesity in adolescents in the Iranian population.

Obesity;Food Habits;Adolescent;Dietary Patterns;Predictors;Overweight Obesity;Food Habits;Adolescent;Dietary Patterns;Predictors;Overweight http://www.ircmj.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=25569 Nimah Bahreini Esfahani Nimah Bahreini Esfahani Department of Community Nutrition, Food Security Research Center, School of Nutrition and Food Science, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, IR Iran; Department of Community Nutrition, Food Security Research Center, School of Nutrition and Food Science, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, IR Iran. Tel: +91-33048537 Department of Community Nutrition, Food Security Research Center, School of Nutrition and Food Science, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, IR Iran; Department of Community Nutrition, Food Security Research Center, School of Nutrition and Food Science, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, IR Iran. Tel: +91-33048537 Neda Ganjali Dashti Neda Ganjali Dashti Department of Civil Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Petronas, Perak, Malaysia Department of Civil Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Petronas, Perak, Malaysia Marjan Ganjali Dashti Marjan Ganjali Dashti School of Biological Science, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penanag, Malaysia School of Biological Science, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penanag, Malaysia Mohd Ismail Noorv Mohd Ismail Noorv Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, School of Healthcare Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Kebangsaan Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, School of Healthcare Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Kebangsaan Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Poh Bee Koon Poh Bee Koon Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, School of Healthcare Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Kebangsaan Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, School of Healthcare Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Kebangsaan Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Ruzita Abd Talib Ruzita Abd Talib Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, School of Healthcare Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Kebangsaan Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, School of Healthcare Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Kebangsaan Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Syarif Husin Lubis Syarif Husin Lubis Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
en 28144454 10.5812/ircmj.28566 Role of IL28-B Polymorphism (rs12979860) on Sustained Virological Response to Pegylated Interferon/Ribavirin in Iranian Patients With Chronic Hepatitis C Role of IL28-B Polymorphism (rs12979860) on Sustained Virological Response to Pegylated Interferon/Ribavirin in Iranian Patients With Chronic Hepatitis C research-article research-article Results

The analysis of data for C/T SNP showed that the CC genotype is more common in the control group than in the group of patients. In contrast, the frequency of TT as a mutant genotype is more frequent in patients than in uninfected people. In addition, results showed a statistically significant relationship between CC, CT, and TT genotypes in sensitive and resistant groups (P value: < 0.001, Or: 0.003, CI: 0-0.047). This relationship was also examined in terms of allele frequency, to determine whether the possibility of resistance to treatment in patients with T allele is more than in patients who carry C allele (P value: < 0.001).

Conclusions

These results showed a significant effect between rs12979860 SNP and sustained virological response (SVR) rate in Iranian patients with chronic HCV. To decrease the cost of long treatments and to prevent severe side effects, determining this polymorphism at the beginning of treatment can be very helpful for patients and physicians.

Background

The current medical treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is pegylated interferon plus ribavirin, but just 50% of genotype 1 HCV patients and about 80% of HCV genotype 3 patients are treated completely. Recently, the rs12979860 C/T polymorphism, which is located 3 kb upstream of the IL28b gene that codes IFNλ3, shows a powerful association in response to the treatment in HCV patients.

Patients and Methods

In this cross-sectional study, 108 blood samples were collected from chronic patients in Iran; 50 unrelated healthy subject samples were also collected. Genomic DNA was extracted, and rs12979860 SNP was done by PCR-RFLP. Finally, products were detected on 12% polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

Objectives

The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between IL28b single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and treatment outcomes among chronic HCV patients in Iran.

Results

The analysis of data for C/T SNP showed that the CC genotype is more common in the control group than in the group of patients. In contrast, the frequency of TT as a mutant genotype is more frequent in patients than in uninfected people. In addition, results showed a statistically significant relationship between CC, CT, and TT genotypes in sensitive and resistant groups (P value: < 0.001, Or: 0.003, CI: 0-0.047). This relationship was also examined in terms of allele frequency, to determine whether the possibility of resistance to treatment in patients with T allele is more than in patients who carry C allele (P value: < 0.001).

Conclusions

These results showed a significant effect between rs12979860 SNP and sustained virological response (SVR) rate in Iranian patients with chronic HCV. To decrease the cost of long treatments and to prevent severe side effects, determining this polymorphism at the beginning of treatment can be very helpful for patients and physicians.

Background

The current medical treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is pegylated interferon plus ribavirin, but just 50% of genotype 1 HCV patients and about 80% of HCV genotype 3 patients are treated completely. Recently, the rs12979860 C/T polymorphism, which is located 3 kb upstream of the IL28b gene that codes IFNλ3, shows a powerful association in response to the treatment in HCV patients.

Patients and Methods

In this cross-sectional study, 108 blood samples were collected from chronic patients in Iran; 50 unrelated healthy subject samples were also collected. Genomic DNA was extracted, and rs12979860 SNP was done by PCR-RFLP. Finally, products were detected on 12% polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

Objectives

The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between IL28b single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and treatment outcomes among chronic HCV patients in Iran.

Hepatitis C Virus;Sustained Virological Responses;, Interleukin 28B;rs12979860;Iran Hepatitis C Virus;Sustained Virological Responses;, Interleukin 28B;rs12979860;Iran http://www.ircmj.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=28566 Mahtab Daneshvar Mahtab Daneshvar Department of Hepatitis and AIDS, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran, IR Iran; Genetics Department, Zanjan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Zanjan, IR Iran Department of Hepatitis and AIDS, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran, IR Iran; Genetics Department, Zanjan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Zanjan, IR Iran Mehri Nikbin Mehri Nikbin Iranian Liver Charity, Tehran, IR Iran Iranian Liver Charity, Tehran, IR Iran Solmaz Talebi Solmaz Talebi Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Foozieh Javadi Foozieh Javadi Department of Hepatitis and AIDS, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran, IR Iran Department of Hepatitis and AIDS, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran, IR Iran Mohammad Reza Aghasadeghi Mohammad Reza Aghasadeghi Department of Hepatitis and AIDS, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran, IR Iran Department of Hepatitis and AIDS, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran, IR Iran Sanaz Mahmazi Sanaz Mahmazi Genetics Department, Zanjan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Zanjan, IR Iran Genetics Department, Zanjan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Zanjan, IR Iran Seyed Mehdi Sadat Seyed Mehdi Sadat Department of Hepatitis and AIDS, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran, IR Iran; No:69, Pasteur Ave, Department of Hepatitis and AIDS, Pasteur Institute of Iran, P. O. Box: 1316943551, Tehran, IR Iran. Tel/Fax: +98-2166969291 Department of Hepatitis and AIDS, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran, IR Iran; No:69, Pasteur Ave, Department of Hepatitis and AIDS, Pasteur Institute of Iran, P. O. Box: 1316943551, Tehran, IR Iran. Tel/Fax: +98-2166969291
en 28144456 10.5812/ircmj.30902 Effect of Homeopathy on Pain Intensity and Quality Of Life of Students With Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Randomized Controlled Trial Effect of Homeopathy on Pain Intensity and Quality Of Life of Students With Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Randomized Controlled Trial research-article research-article Results

Each group comprised 27 students; eventually, 26 in the homeopathic and 21 in the placebo group were followed up. There was no significant difference between the groups for either pain intensity (adjusted difference: -0.44; 95% CI: -1.43 to 0.54) or any other outcomes. Compared with the baseline scores, statistically significant improvements were observed in pain intensity (P = 0.021) and physical health (P = 0.020) scores only in the homeopathic group; and in the mental health score in both groups (P = 0.014 in the homeopathy group and P = 0.010 in the placebo group).

Background

Observational studies indicate a positive association between homeopathy and pain relief and quality of life improvement in women with dysmenorrhea. However, there are no interventional studies in this area.

Objectives

To evaluate an association between homeopathy and pain relief and quality of life improvement in a double-blind placebo-controlled randomized trial with 2 parallel arms.

Methods

Fifty-four students with primary dysmenorrhea residing at the dormitories of the Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran, who had moderate or severe menstrual pain, were randomized to receive either homeopathic remedy or placebo. The homeopath and participants were blinded to treatment assignment. Primary outcomes were pain intensity and quality of life assessed using a 10-cm visual analog scale and short-form 36 (SF-36), respectively, and the secondary outcome was number of analgesic pills used.

Conclusions

This study could not show any significant effect of homeopathy on primary dysmenorrhea in comparison with placebo. Considering the possible effect of the homeopath and the homeopathic remedies prescribed on the results of such interventions, further studies are needed to help us arrive at a conclusion.

Results

Each group comprised 27 students; eventually, 26 in the homeopathic and 21 in the placebo group were followed up. There was no significant difference between the groups for either pain intensity (adjusted difference: -0.44; 95% CI: -1.43 to 0.54) or any other outcomes. Compared with the baseline scores, statistically significant improvements were observed in pain intensity (P = 0.021) and physical health (P = 0.020) scores only in the homeopathic group; and in the mental health score in both groups (P = 0.014 in the homeopathy group and P = 0.010 in the placebo group).

Background

Observational studies indicate a positive association between homeopathy and pain relief and quality of life improvement in women with dysmenorrhea. However, there are no interventional studies in this area.

Objectives

To evaluate an association between homeopathy and pain relief and quality of life improvement in a double-blind placebo-controlled randomized trial with 2 parallel arms.

Methods

Fifty-four students with primary dysmenorrhea residing at the dormitories of the Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran, who had moderate or severe menstrual pain, were randomized to receive either homeopathic remedy or placebo. The homeopath and participants were blinded to treatment assignment. Primary outcomes were pain intensity and quality of life assessed using a 10-cm visual analog scale and short-form 36 (SF-36), respectively, and the secondary outcome was number of analgesic pills used.

Conclusions

This study could not show any significant effect of homeopathy on primary dysmenorrhea in comparison with placebo. Considering the possible effect of the homeopath and the homeopathic remedies prescribed on the results of such interventions, further studies are needed to help us arrive at a conclusion.

Dysmenorrhea;Homeopathy;Quality of Life;Menstruation Disturbances;Complementary Therapies;Pain Dysmenorrhea;Homeopathy;Quality of Life;Menstruation Disturbances;Complementary Therapies;Pain http://www.ircmj.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=30902 Sakineh Mohammad Alizadeh Charandabi Sakineh Mohammad Alizadeh Charandabi Department of Midwifery, Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran Department of Midwifery, Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran Mohammad Hossein Biglu Mohammad Hossein Biglu Basic Sciences Department, Paramedical Faculty, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran Basic Sciences Department, Paramedical Faculty, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran Khatereh Yousefi Rad Khatereh Yousefi Rad Department of Midwifery, Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran; Department of Midwifery, Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran. Tel: +98-9112847391 Department of Midwifery, Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran; Department of Midwifery, Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran. Tel: +98-9112847391
en 28144457 10.5812/ircmj.31218 Alexander Technique Training Coupled With an Integrative Model of Behavioral Prediction in Teachers With Low Back Pain Alexander Technique Training Coupled With an Integrative Model of Behavioral Prediction in Teachers With Low Back Pain research-article research-article Conclusions

The educational framework provided by IM for AT training improved attitude and behavioral beliefs that can facilitate the adoption of AT behavior and decreased CLBP.

Results

Significant differences were recorded before and after intervention (P < 0.001) for the model constructs of intention, perceived risk, direct attitude, behavioral beliefs, and knowledge in both groups. Direct attitude and behavioral beliefs in group A were higher than in group B after the intervention (P < 0.03).

Objectives

The present study applied an integrative model (IM) of behavioral prediction for improvement of AT training.

Methods

This was a quasi-experimental study of female teachers with nonspecific LBP in southern Tehran in 2014. Group A contained 42 subjects and group B had 35 subjects. In group A, AT lessons were designed based on IM constructs, while in group B, AT lessons only were taught. The validity and reliability of the AT questionnaire were confirmed using content validity (CVR 0.91, CVI 0.96) and Cronbach’s α (0.80). The IM constructs of both groups were measured after the completion of training. Statistical analysis used independent and paired samples t-tests and the univariate generalized linear model (GLM).

Background

Individuals suffering from chronic low back pain (CLBP) experience major physical, social, and occupational disruptions. Strong evidence confirms the effectiveness of Alexander technique (AT) training for CLBP.

Conclusions

The educational framework provided by IM for AT training improved attitude and behavioral beliefs that can facilitate the adoption of AT behavior and decreased CLBP.

Results

Significant differences were recorded before and after intervention (P < 0.001) for the model constructs of intention, perceived risk, direct attitude, behavioral beliefs, and knowledge in both groups. Direct attitude and behavioral beliefs in group A were higher than in group B after the intervention (P < 0.03).

Objectives

The present study applied an integrative model (IM) of behavioral prediction for improvement of AT training.

Methods

This was a quasi-experimental study of female teachers with nonspecific LBP in southern Tehran in 2014. Group A contained 42 subjects and group B had 35 subjects. In group A, AT lessons were designed based on IM constructs, while in group B, AT lessons only were taught. The validity and reliability of the AT questionnaire were confirmed using content validity (CVR 0.91, CVI 0.96) and Cronbach’s α (0.80). The IM constructs of both groups were measured after the completion of training. Statistical analysis used independent and paired samples t-tests and the univariate generalized linear model (GLM).

Background

Individuals suffering from chronic low back pain (CLBP) experience major physical, social, and occupational disruptions. Strong evidence confirms the effectiveness of Alexander technique (AT) training for CLBP.

Alexander Technique;Educational Model;Low Back Pain Alexander Technique;Educational Model;Low Back Pain http://www.ircmj.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=31218 Tahereh Kamalikhah Tahereh Kamalikhah Department of Health Education, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, IR Iran Department of Health Education, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, IR Iran Mohammad Ali Morowatisharifabad Mohammad Ali Morowatisharifabad Department of Health Education, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, IR Iran; Research Training Complex of Imam Reza, Behdasht Faculty, P.O. Box: 89165887, Yazd, IR Iran. Tel: +98-2536240691, Fax: +98-2536238555 Department of Health Education, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, IR Iran; Research Training Complex of Imam Reza, Behdasht Faculty, P.O. Box: 89165887, Yazd, IR Iran. Tel: +98-2536240691, Fax: +98-2536238555 Farid Rezaei-Moghaddam Farid Rezaei-Moghaddam Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Army University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Army University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Mohammad Ghasemi Mohammad Ghasemi Health Research Center, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Health Research Center, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Mohammad Gholami-Fesharaki Mohammad Gholami-Fesharaki Department of Biostatistics, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, IR Iran Department of Biostatistics, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, IR Iran Salma Goklani Salma Goklani Rehabilitation Faculty, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Rehabilitation Faculty, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran
en 28144458 10.5812/ircmj.31314 Grape Seed Extract Supplementation and the Effects on the Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress and Metabolic Profiles in Female Volleyball Players: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial Grape Seed Extract Supplementation and the Effects on the Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress and Metabolic Profiles in Female Volleyball Players: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial research-article research-article Conclusions

In conclusion, taking GSE for eight weeks had beneficial effects on the plasma GSH, MDA levels, and markers of insulin metabolism of female volleyball players.

Results

Supplementation with GSE resulted in a significant rise in the plasma glutathione (GSH) level (+265.5 ± 344.2 vs. +2.2 ± 378.2 µmol/L, P = 0.02), as well as a significant decrease in the malondialdehyde (MDA) level (-1.4 ± 2.0 vs. -0.2 ± 1.2 µmol/L, P = 0.01) when compared to the placebo group. In addition, when compared to the group that received the placebo, the subjects who received GSE had significantly decreased serum insulin concentrations (-23.4 ± 23.4 vs. +1.8 ± 25.2 pmol/L, P = 0.002), a decreased homeostasis model of assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (-0.7 ± 0.7 vs. +0.2 ± 0.9, P = 0.002), and an increased quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) (+0.01 ± 0.01 vs. -0.01 ± 0.02, P = 0.03). The administration of GSE had no significant effects on creatine phosphokinase (CPK), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), nitric oxide (NO), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), and lipid concentrations when compared with the administration of the placebo. However, after controlling for baseline NO levels, age, and baseline BMI, the changes in the plasma NO concentrations were significantly different between the two groups.

Objectives

This study was conducted to determine the effects of GSE administration on the metabolic status of female volleyball players.

Methods

This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was performed among 40 female volleyball players. The subjects were randomly divided into two groups, with members of the test group (n = 20) taking 300 mg of GSE twice a day for eight weeks and members of the control group (n = 20) taking a placebo pearl for the same period. Fasting blood samples were taken before and after the eight-week intervention period in order to determine the related variables.

Background

Only limited data are available for evaluating the effects of the administration of grape seed extract (GSE) on the metabolic status of female volleyball players.

Conclusions

In conclusion, taking GSE for eight weeks had beneficial effects on the plasma GSH, MDA levels, and markers of insulin metabolism of female volleyball players.

Results

Supplementation with GSE resulted in a significant rise in the plasma glutathione (GSH) level (+265.5 ± 344.2 vs. +2.2 ± 378.2 µmol/L, P = 0.02), as well as a significant decrease in the malondialdehyde (MDA) level (-1.4 ± 2.0 vs. -0.2 ± 1.2 µmol/L, P = 0.01) when compared to the placebo group. In addition, when compared to the group that received the placebo, the subjects who received GSE had significantly decreased serum insulin concentrations (-23.4 ± 23.4 vs. +1.8 ± 25.2 pmol/L, P = 0.002), a decreased homeostasis model of assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (-0.7 ± 0.7 vs. +0.2 ± 0.9, P = 0.002), and an increased quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) (+0.01 ± 0.01 vs. -0.01 ± 0.02, P = 0.03). The administration of GSE had no significant effects on creatine phosphokinase (CPK), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), nitric oxide (NO), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), and lipid concentrations when compared with the administration of the placebo. However, after controlling for baseline NO levels, age, and baseline BMI, the changes in the plasma NO concentrations were significantly different between the two groups.

Objectives

This study was conducted to determine the effects of GSE administration on the metabolic status of female volleyball players.

Methods

This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was performed among 40 female volleyball players. The subjects were randomly divided into two groups, with members of the test group (n = 20) taking 300 mg of GSE twice a day for eight weeks and members of the control group (n = 20) taking a placebo pearl for the same period. Fasting blood samples were taken before and after the eight-week intervention period in order to determine the related variables.

Background

Only limited data are available for evaluating the effects of the administration of grape seed extract (GSE) on the metabolic status of female volleyball players.

Grape Seed Extract;Oxidative Stress;Athletes Grape Seed Extract;Oxidative Stress;Athletes http://www.ircmj.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=31314 Mohsen Taghizadeh Mohsen Taghizadeh Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, IR Iran Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, IR Iran Elaheh Malekian Elaheh Malekian Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, IR Iran Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, IR Iran Mohammad Reza Memarzadeh Mohammad Reza Memarzadeh Barij Medicinal Plants Research Center, Kashan, IR Iran Barij Medicinal Plants Research Center, Kashan, IR Iran Ali Akbar Mohammadi Ali Akbar Mohammadi Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, IR Iran Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, IR Iran Zatollah Asemi Zatollah Asemi Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, IR Iran; Department of Nutrition, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, IR Iran. Tel: +98-3155463378; Fax: +98-3155463377 Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, IR Iran; Department of Nutrition, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, IR Iran. Tel: +98-3155463378; Fax: +98-3155463377
en 28144460 10.5812/ircmj.31737 The Effect of Aerobic Exercise Training on Plasma Apelin Levels and Pain Threshold in T1DM Rats The Effect of Aerobic Exercise Training on Plasma Apelin Levels and Pain Threshold in T1DM Rats research-article research-article Conclusions

These findings suggest that apelin does not play any significant role in regulating the pain threshold in type 1 diabetes mellitus during exercise training.

Results

Plasma apelin level was higher (0.3 vs. 0.1, P < 0.0001) and the tail-flick latency was lower (2.2 vs. 3.8, P < 0.0001) in the D group than in the ND group. After the training program, plasma apelin levels decreased in the exercise groups, and the tail-flick latency increased in the ED group. No correlation was found between apelin blood concentrations and tail-flick latency following the training program in the ED group.

Objectives

The present experimental study was conducted in Iran and investigated the role of apelin, which is used to manage type 1 diabetes mellitus, during exercise training.

Materials and Methods

Male Wistar rats (n = 36) were assigned by simple random allocation to six groups (n = 6): non-diabetic (ND), diabetic (D), sedentary non-diabetic (SND), sedentary diabetic (SD), exercise non-diabetic (END), and exercise diabetic (ED). Diabetes was induced by a single subcutaneous injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg). Exercise training consisted of treadmill running 60 minutes/day × 5 days/week for 10 weeks. The tail-flick test was used to assess the thermal pain threshold, and an apelin enzyme immunoassay kit was utilized to assess plasma apelin levels.

Background

Diabetes mellitus (types 1 and 2) leads to secondary complications such as neuropathy, which reduce a patient’s quality of life. Apelin and its receptor, APJ, have been shown to have antinociceptive effects and to decrease blood glucose levels.

Conclusions

These findings suggest that apelin does not play any significant role in regulating the pain threshold in type 1 diabetes mellitus during exercise training.

Results

Plasma apelin level was higher (0.3 vs. 0.1, P < 0.0001) and the tail-flick latency was lower (2.2 vs. 3.8, P < 0.0001) in the D group than in the ND group. After the training program, plasma apelin levels decreased in the exercise groups, and the tail-flick latency increased in the ED group. No correlation was found between apelin blood concentrations and tail-flick latency following the training program in the ED group.

Objectives

The present experimental study was conducted in Iran and investigated the role of apelin, which is used to manage type 1 diabetes mellitus, during exercise training.

Materials and Methods

Male Wistar rats (n = 36) were assigned by simple random allocation to six groups (n = 6): non-diabetic (ND), diabetic (D), sedentary non-diabetic (SND), sedentary diabetic (SD), exercise non-diabetic (END), and exercise diabetic (ED). Diabetes was induced by a single subcutaneous injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg). Exercise training consisted of treadmill running 60 minutes/day × 5 days/week for 10 weeks. The tail-flick test was used to assess the thermal pain threshold, and an apelin enzyme immunoassay kit was utilized to assess plasma apelin levels.

Background

Diabetes mellitus (types 1 and 2) leads to secondary complications such as neuropathy, which reduce a patient’s quality of life. Apelin and its receptor, APJ, have been shown to have antinociceptive effects and to decrease blood glucose levels.

Apelin Protein;Rat;Pain Threshold;Exercise;Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Apelin Protein;Rat;Pain Threshold;Exercise;Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus http://www.ircmj.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=31737 Reza Delavar Reza Delavar Exercise Physiology Department, Faculty of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamadan, IR Iran Exercise Physiology Department, Faculty of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamadan, IR Iran Ali Heidarianpour Ali Heidarianpour Exercise Physiology Department, Faculty of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamadan, IR Iran; Exercise Physiology Department, Faculty of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamadan, IR Iran. Tel: +98-8138381422, Fax: +98-8138381421 Exercise Physiology Department, Faculty of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamadan, IR Iran; Exercise Physiology Department, Faculty of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamadan, IR Iran. Tel: +98-8138381422, Fax: +98-8138381421
en 28144461 10.5812/ircmj.35382 Feasibility, Reliability, and Validity of the Iranian Version of the Quality of Life Questionnaire for Pregnancy Feasibility, Reliability, and Validity of the Iranian Version of the Quality of Life Questionnaire for Pregnancy research-article research-article Conclusions

The findings support the validity and reliability of the Iranian version of the QOL-GRAV questionnaire. Therefore, it is recommended to be used for both clinical and research purposes.

Results

The QOL-GRAV showed good content validity (CVI value = 0.95 and CVR value = 1), internal consistency (α = 0.79), and test–retest reliability (ICC = 0.86). The results of the CFA for two-factor models indicate an acceptable fit of the proposed model (RMSEA; 90% CI = 0.083; 0.068–0.099, CFI = 0.95, GFI = 0.96, and AGFI = 0.92).

Objectives

The aim of this study was to validate the Quality of life gravidarum (QOL-GRAV) questionnaire for Iranian women during the pregnant period

Patients and Methods

In this cross-sectional methodological study, content validity following back and forward translation was assessed by a panel of experts. Using the two-stage cluster sampling method, 565 pregnant women referred to health care centers from April to June 2015 in Tabriz, Iran were enrolled in the study. Construct validity by assessing the factor structure, and convergent and discriminant validity were evaluated using scale-item correlations and known group analyses. Internal consistency and test–retest reliability were assessed in a sample of 30 pregnant women by the Cronbach’s α coefficient and intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC).

Background

Clinical studies are giving increased importance to quality of life assessments as measures of the relative effectiveness of prevention and treatment programs used during pregnancy and antenatally.

Conclusions

The findings support the validity and reliability of the Iranian version of the QOL-GRAV questionnaire. Therefore, it is recommended to be used for both clinical and research purposes.

Results

The QOL-GRAV showed good content validity (CVI value = 0.95 and CVR value = 1), internal consistency (α = 0.79), and test–retest reliability (ICC = 0.86). The results of the CFA for two-factor models indicate an acceptable fit of the proposed model (RMSEA; 90% CI = 0.083; 0.068–0.099, CFI = 0.95, GFI = 0.96, and AGFI = 0.92).

Objectives

The aim of this study was to validate the Quality of life gravidarum (QOL-GRAV) questionnaire for Iranian women during the pregnant period

Patients and Methods

In this cross-sectional methodological study, content validity following back and forward translation was assessed by a panel of experts. Using the two-stage cluster sampling method, 565 pregnant women referred to health care centers from April to June 2015 in Tabriz, Iran were enrolled in the study. Construct validity by assessing the factor structure, and convergent and discriminant validity were evaluated using scale-item correlations and known group analyses. Internal consistency and test–retest reliability were assessed in a sample of 30 pregnant women by the Cronbach’s α coefficient and intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC).

Background

Clinical studies are giving increased importance to quality of life assessments as measures of the relative effectiveness of prevention and treatment programs used during pregnancy and antenatally.

Feasibility;Validity;Reliability;Quality of Life;Pregnancy;Iran Feasibility;Validity;Reliability;Quality of Life;Pregnancy;Iran http://www.ircmj.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=35382 Mojgan Mirghafourvand Mojgan Mirghafourvand Nursing and Midwifery Faculty, Midwifery Department, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran Nursing and Midwifery Faculty, Midwifery Department, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran Sakineh Mohammad-Alizadeh-Charandabi Sakineh Mohammad-Alizadeh-Charandabi Midwifery Department, Research Center of Social Determinants of Health, Nursing and Midwifery Faculty, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran Midwifery Department, Research Center of Social Determinants of Health, Nursing and Midwifery Faculty, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran Mohammad Asghari Jafarabadi Mohammad Asghari Jafarabadi Road Traffic Injury Research Center, Faculty of Health, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran Road Traffic Injury Research Center, Faculty of Health, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran Fatemeh Shiri Fatemeh Shiri Students’ Research Committee, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences (International Branch Aras), Tabriz, IR Iran Students’ Research Committee, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences (International Branch Aras), Tabriz, IR Iran Solmaz Ghanbari-Homayi Solmaz Ghanbari-Homayi Students’ Research Committee, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran; Students’ research committee, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran. Tel: +98-4134772699, Fax: +98-4134752839 Students’ Research Committee, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran; Students’ research committee, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran. Tel: +98-4134772699, Fax: +98-4134752839
en 28144462 10.5812/ircmj.35421 Effect of Vocalization of the Holy Quran With and Without Translation on Pregnancy Outcomes: A Randomized Clinical Trial Effect of Vocalization of the Holy Quran With and Without Translation on Pregnancy Outcomes: A Randomized Clinical Trial research-article research-article Materials and Methods

This was a three-armed parallel-group randomized clinical trial in which 168 pregnant women (25-28 weeks) in their first and second pregnancies were divided into three groups of 56 (Holy Quran with translation, Holy Quran without translation, and control group) by randomized blocking. The intervention was implemented once a week for three weeks in the health center, and on other days of the week, the participants listened at home to a CD they were given. The intervention and the control groups all received routine pregnancy care once a week. These mothers were tracked during their labor. Outcomes including gestational age at delivery, delivery type, and neonatal anthropometric indices were recorded based on the mother’s records.

Objectives

This study aimed to determine the effect of vocalizations of the Holy Quran with and without translation on the consequences of pregnancy (the prevalence of preterm delivery, caesarean delivery, and neonatal anthropometric indices) in women admitted to health care centers in Urmia, Iran.

Conclusions

Based on the results of this study, despite the lower prevalence of preterm labor and caesarean section in the intervention groups as compared to the control group, no statistically significant effect was seen. This was apparently due to the small sample size.

Results

There was no statistically significant difference between the groups in terms of demographic and obstetric characteristics before the intervention. In comparison with the control group, the probability of preterm delivery was lower in the Holy Quran with translation group (odds ratio: 0.3, CI 95%: 0.1-1.2) and in the Holy Quran without translation group (0.6, 0.2-1.9) as compared to the control group. However, this difference was not statistically significant. Similarly, the probability of caesarean delivery was lower in the Holy Quran with translation group (0.6, 0.3-1.4) and the Holy Quran without translation group (0.5, 0.2-1.2) as compared to the control group. Based on one-way ANOVA, there was no statistically significant difference between the study groups regarding the infants’ anthropometric indices.

Background

During recent decades, research in Iran in the area of the Quran and medical science has been seriously engaged in. With respect to the tendency toward spirituality and alternative medicine, we tried to find other aspects of the influence of the Quran.

Materials and Methods

This was a three-armed parallel-group randomized clinical trial in which 168 pregnant women (25-28 weeks) in their first and second pregnancies were divided into three groups of 56 (Holy Quran with translation, Holy Quran without translation, and control group) by randomized blocking. The intervention was implemented once a week for three weeks in the health center, and on other days of the week, the participants listened at home to a CD they were given. The intervention and the control groups all received routine pregnancy care once a week. These mothers were tracked during their labor. Outcomes including gestational age at delivery, delivery type, and neonatal anthropometric indices were recorded based on the mother’s records.

Objectives

This study aimed to determine the effect of vocalizations of the Holy Quran with and without translation on the consequences of pregnancy (the prevalence of preterm delivery, caesarean delivery, and neonatal anthropometric indices) in women admitted to health care centers in Urmia, Iran.

Conclusions

Based on the results of this study, despite the lower prevalence of preterm labor and caesarean section in the intervention groups as compared to the control group, no statistically significant effect was seen. This was apparently due to the small sample size.

Results

There was no statistically significant difference between the groups in terms of demographic and obstetric characteristics before the intervention. In comparison with the control group, the probability of preterm delivery was lower in the Holy Quran with translation group (odds ratio: 0.3, CI 95%: 0.1-1.2) and in the Holy Quran without translation group (0.6, 0.2-1.9) as compared to the control group. However, this difference was not statistically significant. Similarly, the probability of caesarean delivery was lower in the Holy Quran with translation group (0.6, 0.3-1.4) and the Holy Quran without translation group (0.5, 0.2-1.2) as compared to the control group. Based on one-way ANOVA, there was no statistically significant difference between the study groups regarding the infants’ anthropometric indices.

Background

During recent decades, research in Iran in the area of the Quran and medical science has been seriously engaged in. With respect to the tendency toward spirituality and alternative medicine, we tried to find other aspects of the influence of the Quran.

Caesarean Section;Anthropometric Indices;Neonatal, Preterm Labor;Quran Caesarean Section;Anthropometric Indices;Neonatal, Preterm Labor;Quran http://www.ircmj.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=35421 Mojgan Mirghafourvand Mojgan Mirghafourvand Department of Midwifery, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran Department of Midwifery, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran Fahimeh Sehhati Shafaie Fahimeh Sehhati Shafaie Department of Midwifery, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran Department of Midwifery, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran Sakineh Mohammad-Alizadeh-Charandabi Sakineh Mohammad-Alizadeh-Charandabi Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Department of Midwifery, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Department of Midwifery, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran Batoul Jabbari Batoul Jabbari Student Research Committee, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran; MSc of Midwifery, Student Research Committee, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran. Tel: +98-9143478379 Student Research Committee, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran; MSc of Midwifery, Student Research Committee, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran. Tel: +98-9143478379
en 28144464 10.5812/ircmj.36982 Effects of Second and Third Generation Oral Contraceptives on Lipid and Carbohydrate Metabolism in Overweight and Obese Women: A Randomized Triple-Blind Controlled Trial Effects of Second and Third Generation Oral Contraceptives on Lipid and Carbohydrate Metabolism in Overweight and Obese Women: A Randomized Triple-Blind Controlled Trial research-article research-article Conclusions

We observed no significant differences between the two groups in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism, except for HDL-C. Considering the importance of overweight and obese women’s health, studies with longer follow-up periods are recommended in this respect.

Results

The differences in lipid and carbohydrate parameters were not significant between the two groups, except for HDL-C (Adjusted MD (CI95%) = 7.00 (2.98 to 11.02)). HDL-C decreased with EE/LGN (P = 0.016) and increased with EE/DSG (P = 0.004). LDL-C and TC increased in both groups, whereas TG increased only with EE/DSG (P < 0.05). Compared with the baseline, FPG levels did not differ significantly in both groups, but EE/DSG increased 2-hour 75-g OGTT (P = 0.010).

Background

Combined oral contraceptives (COCs) have not been shown to have major effects on lipid and carbohydrate metabolism in normal-weight women. However, we have limited information about the effects on women at high risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes due to being overweight and obese.

Objectives

To evaluate the effects of second and third generation contraceptive pills on lipid and carbohydrate metabolism in overweight and obese women.

Patients and Methods

This triple-blind controlled trial was performed on 137 healthy women aged 18 - 40 years with a body mass index of 25-34.9 (kg/m2) who were referred to health centers in Tabriz, Iran from 2014 to 2015. The women were randomly divided into groups who were to take 30 mcg ethinyl estradiol/150 mcg levonorgestrel (EE/LGN) (n = 69) or 30 mcg ethinyl estradiol/150 mcg desogestrel (EE/DSG) (n = 68) with an allocation ratio of 1: 1 for three cycles. As primary outcomes, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) were assessed; total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), and 2-hour plasma glucose in the 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (2-hour 75-g OGTT) were assessed as secondary outcomes.

Conclusions

We observed no significant differences between the two groups in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism, except for HDL-C. Considering the importance of overweight and obese women’s health, studies with longer follow-up periods are recommended in this respect.

Results

The differences in lipid and carbohydrate parameters were not significant between the two groups, except for HDL-C (Adjusted MD (CI95%) = 7.00 (2.98 to 11.02)). HDL-C decreased with EE/LGN (P = 0.016) and increased with EE/DSG (P = 0.004). LDL-C and TC increased in both groups, whereas TG increased only with EE/DSG (P < 0.05). Compared with the baseline, FPG levels did not differ significantly in both groups, but EE/DSG increased 2-hour 75-g OGTT (P = 0.010).

Background

Combined oral contraceptives (COCs) have not been shown to have major effects on lipid and carbohydrate metabolism in normal-weight women. However, we have limited information about the effects on women at high risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes due to being overweight and obese.

Objectives

To evaluate the effects of second and third generation contraceptive pills on lipid and carbohydrate metabolism in overweight and obese women.

Patients and Methods

This triple-blind controlled trial was performed on 137 healthy women aged 18 - 40 years with a body mass index of 25-34.9 (kg/m2) who were referred to health centers in Tabriz, Iran from 2014 to 2015. The women were randomly divided into groups who were to take 30 mcg ethinyl estradiol/150 mcg levonorgestrel (EE/LGN) (n = 69) or 30 mcg ethinyl estradiol/150 mcg desogestrel (EE/DSG) (n = 68) with an allocation ratio of 1: 1 for three cycles. As primary outcomes, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) were assessed; total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), and 2-hour plasma glucose in the 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (2-hour 75-g OGTT) were assessed as secondary outcomes.

Levonorgestrel;Desogestrel;Overweight;Obesity;Lipid metabolism;Carbohydrate Metabolism Levonorgestrel;Desogestrel;Overweight;Obesity;Lipid metabolism;Carbohydrate Metabolism http://www.ircmj.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=36982 Mahnaz Shahnazi Mahnaz Shahnazi Department of Midwifery, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran Department of Midwifery, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran Azizeh Farshbaf-Khalili Azizeh Farshbaf-Khalili Department of Midwifery, Nursing and Midwifery Faculty, Tabriz Health Services Management Research Centre, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran Department of Midwifery, Nursing and Midwifery Faculty, Tabriz Health Services Management Research Centre, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran Samira Pourzeinali-Beilankouh Samira Pourzeinali-Beilankouh Department of Midwifery, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran; Department of Midwifery, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran. Tel: +98-4134474467, Fax: +98-4134796969 Department of Midwifery, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran; Department of Midwifery, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran. Tel: +98-4134474467, Fax: +98-4134796969 Farnaz Sadrimehr Farnaz Sadrimehr Department of Midwifery, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran Department of Midwifery, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran
en 28144465 10.5812/ircmj.37574 Incidence Rate of Post-Intubation Tracheal Stenosis in Patients Admitted to Five Intensive Care Units in Iran Incidence Rate of Post-Intubation Tracheal Stenosis in Patients Admitted to Five Intensive Care Units in Iran research-article research-article Conclusions

To enhance the follow-up rate, three strategies were proposed: patient-focused strategies such as emphasizing patient education upon discharge and providing rewards; structural-focused strategies such as scheduling home visits and uploading questionnaires onto the research center’s website; and provider-focused strategies such as selecting coordinators with good communication skills. All necessary resources should also be re-arranged for a multicenter national study.

Methods

This prospective cohort study was conducted in five hospitals in two provinces (Tehran and Arak) of Iran from November 2011 to March 2013. All patients admitted to ICUs who underwent more than 24 hours of endotracheal intubation were included. Upon their discharge from the ICUs, the patients received oral and written educational materials intended to ensure a more successful follow-up. The patients were asked to come back for follow-up three months after their extubation, or sooner in case of any symptoms developing. Those with dyspnea or stridor underwent a bronchoscopy. The asymptomatic patients were given a spirometry and then they underwent a bronchoscopy if the flow-volume loop suggested airway stenosis.

Background

Tracheal stenosis is one of the worst complications associated with endotracheal intubation and it is the most common reason for reconstructive airway surgeries. Due to various local risk factors, the incidence rate of tracheal stenosis may vary in different countries. In order to estimate the incidence rate of post-intubation tracheal stenosis (PITS) in patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU), a follow-up study was planned. As there was no similar methodological model in the literature, a feasibility step was also designed to examine the whole project and to enhance the follow-up rate.

Results

Some seventy-three patients (70% men) were included in the study. Multiple trauma secondary to motor vehicle accidents (52%) was the most common cause of intubation. Follow-ups were completed in only 14 (19.2%, CI = 0.109 - 0.300) patients. One patient (7%, CI = 0.007 - 0.288) developed symptomatic tracheal stenosis that was confirmed by bronchoscopy. The barriers to a successful follow-up were assessed on three levels: ineffective oral education upon discharge, improper usage of educational materials, and difficulties to attending follow-up visits. There were also some important obstacles in terms of human, time, material, and cost resources, as well as data management.

Objectives

To estimate the PITS incidence rate in patients admitted to ICUs, as well as to evaluate the feasibility of the study.

Conclusions

To enhance the follow-up rate, three strategies were proposed: patient-focused strategies such as emphasizing patient education upon discharge and providing rewards; structural-focused strategies such as scheduling home visits and uploading questionnaires onto the research center’s website; and provider-focused strategies such as selecting coordinators with good communication skills. All necessary resources should also be re-arranged for a multicenter national study.

Methods

This prospective cohort study was conducted in five hospitals in two provinces (Tehran and Arak) of Iran from November 2011 to March 2013. All patients admitted to ICUs who underwent more than 24 hours of endotracheal intubation were included. Upon their discharge from the ICUs, the patients received oral and written educational materials intended to ensure a more successful follow-up. The patients were asked to come back for follow-up three months after their extubation, or sooner in case of any symptoms developing. Those with dyspnea or stridor underwent a bronchoscopy. The asymptomatic patients were given a spirometry and then they underwent a bronchoscopy if the flow-volume loop suggested airway stenosis.

Background

Tracheal stenosis is one of the worst complications associated with endotracheal intubation and it is the most common reason for reconstructive airway surgeries. Due to various local risk factors, the incidence rate of tracheal stenosis may vary in different countries. In order to estimate the incidence rate of post-intubation tracheal stenosis (PITS) in patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU), a follow-up study was planned. As there was no similar methodological model in the literature, a feasibility step was also designed to examine the whole project and to enhance the follow-up rate.

Results

Some seventy-three patients (70% men) were included in the study. Multiple trauma secondary to motor vehicle accidents (52%) was the most common cause of intubation. Follow-ups were completed in only 14 (19.2%, CI = 0.109 - 0.300) patients. One patient (7%, CI = 0.007 - 0.288) developed symptomatic tracheal stenosis that was confirmed by bronchoscopy. The barriers to a successful follow-up were assessed on three levels: ineffective oral education upon discharge, improper usage of educational materials, and difficulties to attending follow-up visits. There were also some important obstacles in terms of human, time, material, and cost resources, as well as data management.

Objectives

To estimate the PITS incidence rate in patients admitted to ICUs, as well as to evaluate the feasibility of the study.

Tracheal;Stenosis;Lost to Follow-Up;Study;Feasibility;Policy Tracheal;Stenosis;Lost to Follow-Up;Study;Feasibility;Policy http://www.ircmj.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=37574 Roya Farzanegan Roya Farzanegan Tracheal Diseases Research Center (TDRC), National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases (NRITLD), Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Tracheal Diseases Research Center (TDRC), National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases (NRITLD), Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Behrooz Farzanegan Behrooz Farzanegan Tracheal Diseases Research Center (TDRC), National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases (NRITLD), Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Tracheal Diseases Research Center (TDRC), National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases (NRITLD), Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Mahdi Zangi Mahdi Zangi Tracheal Diseases Research Center (TDRC), National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases (NRITLD), Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Tracheal Diseases Research Center (TDRC), National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases (NRITLD), Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Majid Golestani Eraghi Majid Golestani Eraghi Tracheal Diseases Research Center (TDRC), National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases (NRITLD), Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Tracheal Diseases Research Center (TDRC), National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases (NRITLD), Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Shahram Noorbakhsh Shahram Noorbakhsh Social Security Organization, Tehran, IR Iran Social Security Organization, Tehran, IR Iran Neda Doozandeh Tabarestani Neda Doozandeh Tabarestani Tracheal Diseases Research Center (TDRC), National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases (NRITLD), Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Tracheal Diseases Research Center (TDRC), National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases (NRITLD), Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Mohammad Behgam Shadmehr Mohammad Behgam Shadmehr Tracheal Diseases Research Center (TDRC), National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases (NRITLD), Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Tracheal Diseases Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Massih Daneshvari Hospital, Tehran, IR Iran. Tel: +98-2127122163, Fax: +98-212610538 Tracheal Diseases Research Center (TDRC), National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases (NRITLD), Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Tracheal Diseases Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Massih Daneshvari Hospital, Tehran, IR Iran. Tel: +98-2127122163, Fax: +98-212610538
en 28144467 10.5812/ircmj.38871 Predictors of Health-Promoting Behaviors in Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery Patients: An Application of Pender’s Health Promotion Model Predictors of Health-Promoting Behaviors in Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery Patients: An Application of Pender’s Health Promotion Model research-article research-article Conclusions

According to the results of the study, health-promoting model-based self-care behaviors can help identify and predict cardiac surgery patients’ lifestyles in Iran. This pattern can be used as a framework for discharge planning and the implementation of educational interventions to improve the lifestyles of CABG patients.

Background

Advances in coronary artery surgery have reduced patient morbidity and mortality. Nevertheless, patients still have to face physical, psychological, and social problems after discharge from hospital.

Objectives

The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of Pender’s health promotion model in predicting cardiac surgery patients’ lifestyles in Iran.

Methods

This cross-sectional study comprised 220 patients who had undergone coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery in Mazandaran province (Iran) in 2015. The subjects were selected using a simple random sampling method. The data were collected via (1) the health-promoting lifestyle profile II (HPLP II) and (2) a self-designed questionnaire that included two main sections: demographic characteristics and questions based on the health-promoting model constructs.

Results

Spiritual growth (28.77 ± 5.03) and physical activity (15.79 ± 5.08) had the highest and lowest scores in the HPLP II dimensions, respectively. All the health promotion model variables were significant predictors of health-promoting behaviors and explained 69% of the variance in health-promoting behaviors. Three significant predictors were estimated using regression coefficients: behavioral feelings (β = 0.390, P < 0.001), perceived benefits (β = 0.209, P < 0.001), and commitment to a plan of action (β = 0.347, P < 0.001).

Conclusions

According to the results of the study, health-promoting model-based self-care behaviors can help identify and predict cardiac surgery patients’ lifestyles in Iran. This pattern can be used as a framework for discharge planning and the implementation of educational interventions to improve the lifestyles of CABG patients.

Background

Advances in coronary artery surgery have reduced patient morbidity and mortality. Nevertheless, patients still have to face physical, psychological, and social problems after discharge from hospital.

Objectives

The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of Pender’s health promotion model in predicting cardiac surgery patients’ lifestyles in Iran.

Methods

This cross-sectional study comprised 220 patients who had undergone coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery in Mazandaran province (Iran) in 2015. The subjects were selected using a simple random sampling method. The data were collected via (1) the health-promoting lifestyle profile II (HPLP II) and (2) a self-designed questionnaire that included two main sections: demographic characteristics and questions based on the health-promoting model constructs.

Results

Spiritual growth (28.77 ± 5.03) and physical activity (15.79 ± 5.08) had the highest and lowest scores in the HPLP II dimensions, respectively. All the health promotion model variables were significant predictors of health-promoting behaviors and explained 69% of the variance in health-promoting behaviors. Three significant predictors were estimated using regression coefficients: behavioral feelings (β = 0.390, P < 0.001), perceived benefits (β = 0.209, P < 0.001), and commitment to a plan of action (β = 0.347, P < 0.001).

Self-Care Behavior;Health Promotion Model;Coronary Artery Bypass;Healthy Lifestyle Self-Care Behavior;Health Promotion Model;Coronary Artery Bypass;Healthy Lifestyle http://www.ircmj.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=38871 Hossein Mohsenipoua Hossein Mohsenipoua Department of Health Education and Promotion, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, International Campus (TUMS- IC), Tehran, IR Iran Department of Health Education and Promotion, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, International Campus (TUMS- IC), Tehran, IR Iran Fereshteh Majlessi Fereshteh Majlessi Department of Health Education and Promotion, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Department of Health Education and Promotion, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Davood Shojaeizadeh Davood Shojaeizadeh Department of Health Education and Promotion, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Department of Health Education and Promotion, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran. Fax: +98-2188896696 Department of Health Education and Promotion, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Department of Health Education and Promotion, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran. Fax: +98-2188896696 Abbas Rahimiforooshani Abbas Rahimiforooshani Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran Rahman Ghafari Rahman Ghafari Department of Cardiac Surgery, School of Medicine, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, IR Iran Department of Cardiac Surgery, School of Medicine, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, IR Iran Valiollah Habibi Valiollah Habibi Department of Cardiac Surgery, School of Medicine, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, IR Iran Department of Cardiac Surgery, School of Medicine, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, IR Iran
en 28144455 10.5812/ircmj.29771 Breastfeeding as a Protective Effect Against Childhood Leukemia and Lymphoma Breastfeeding as a Protective Effect Against Childhood Leukemia and Lymphoma brief-report brief-report Conclusions

The current study showed that breastfeeding duration has no protective effect against childhood leukemia and lymphoma. In addition, we suggest that some factors such as living in a rural area, smoking during pregnancy, parents’ exposure to chemical materials and low socioeconomic status can increase the incidence rate of childhood leukemia and lymphoma.

Results

Our findings showed that breastfeeding duration had no significant difference between cases and controls. However, the rural living percentage in patients with leukemia and lymphoma was higher than in the control group (39.8% versus 14.6% [P < 0.001 and OR = 3.87]) and parents’ exposure to chemical materials during the war between Iran and Iraq was higher in sick patients (6.5% versus 0% [OR = 20.2%]).

Patients and methods

Through this case control study, we compared 123 patients with leukemia and lymphoma to a control group of 137 healthy children. Statistical analysis was done using the Chi-square test and t-test as well as logistic regression methods. A P-value of less than 0.05 was considered significant.

Background

Over the past several years, breastfeeding has been associated with many benefits as well as protective effects against many diseases. There is limited evidence for the relationship between breastfeeding and the incidence of leukemia.

Objectives

In this study, we evaluate the correlation of childhood leukemia and lymphoma with breastfeeding duration in children in southern Iran.

Conclusions

The current study showed that breastfeeding duration has no protective effect against childhood leukemia and lymphoma. In addition, we suggest that some factors such as living in a rural area, smoking during pregnancy, parents’ exposure to chemical materials and low socioeconomic status can increase the incidence rate of childhood leukemia and lymphoma.

Results

Our findings showed that breastfeeding duration had no significant difference between cases and controls. However, the rural living percentage in patients with leukemia and lymphoma was higher than in the control group (39.8% versus 14.6% [P < 0.001 and OR = 3.87]) and parents’ exposure to chemical materials during the war between Iran and Iraq was higher in sick patients (6.5% versus 0% [OR = 20.2%]).

Patients and methods

Through this case control study, we compared 123 patients with leukemia and lymphoma to a control group of 137 healthy children. Statistical analysis was done using the Chi-square test and t-test as well as logistic regression methods. A P-value of less than 0.05 was considered significant.

Background

Over the past several years, breastfeeding has been associated with many benefits as well as protective effects against many diseases. There is limited evidence for the relationship between breastfeeding and the incidence of leukemia.

Objectives

In this study, we evaluate the correlation of childhood leukemia and lymphoma with breastfeeding duration in children in southern Iran.

Breastfeeding;Leukemia;Lymphoma Breastfeeding;Leukemia;Lymphoma http://www.ircmj.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=29771 Mehran Karimi Mehran Karimi Hematology Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran; Pediatric Hematology-Oncology Hematology Research Center, Nemazee hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran. Tel: +98-7116473239, Fax: +98-7113239 Hematology Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran; Pediatric Hematology-Oncology Hematology Research Center, Nemazee hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran. Tel: +98-7116473239, Fax: +98-7113239 Mahmoud Haghighat Mahmoud Haghighat Department of Pediatrics, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Department of Pediatrics, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Zahra Dialameh Zahra Dialameh Hematology Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Hematology Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Leila Tahmasbi Leila Tahmasbi Hematology Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Hematology Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Shirin Parand Shirin Parand Hematology Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Hematology Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran Marzieh Bardestani Marzieh Bardestani Department of Library and Information Science, College of Humanities, Khouzestan Science and research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Ahvaz, IR Iran Department of Library and Information Science, College of Humanities, Khouzestan Science and research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Ahvaz, IR Iran
en 28144459 10.5812/ircmj.31439 A Rare Coexistence of Retrorectal and Ovarian Cysts: A Case Report A Rare Coexistence of Retrorectal and Ovarian Cysts: A Case Report case-report case-report Introduction

Retrorectal cysts are rare benign lesions which are frequently diagnosed in middle-aged females. According to their origin and histopathologic features, retrorectal cysts are classified as squamous-lined (dermoid or epidermoid) cysts, postanal gut (tailgut) cysts, and rectal duplications (enteric or enterogenous cysts, enterocystomas). Described in this case report is an extremely unusual patient, a woman who simultaneously had a retrorectal cyst and an ovarian serous cystadenoma in addition to a long history of misdiagnosis and multiple unsuccessful surgeries.

Conclusions

Coexistence of a retrorectal cyst and a serous cystadenoma is very unusual. Retrorectal cysts are rare entities that remain a difficult diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Misdiagnosis and multiple unsuccessful surgeries are common. Complete surgical removal is the treatment of choice and requires a multidisciplinary approach in complicated cases.

Case Presentation

The patient was a 45-year-old female who presented with back pain, rectal fullness, constipation, and urinary symptoms. Upon her first pregnancy, a cystic pelvic mass had been misdiagnosed as an ovarian cyst. During the following 17 years, she had undergone several ineffective operations. The last CT scan and MRI studies revealed two separate noncalcified, unilocular, cystic lesions with well-defined borders in the retrorectal and retroperitoneal spaces. Two cysts were excised completely by a combined abdominoperineal approach. Pathological assessment revealed a dermoid cyst and an ovarian serous cystadenoma. No complications occurred during the 18 months of follow-up.

Introduction

Retrorectal cysts are rare benign lesions which are frequently diagnosed in middle-aged females. According to their origin and histopathologic features, retrorectal cysts are classified as squamous-lined (dermoid or epidermoid) cysts, postanal gut (tailgut) cysts, and rectal duplications (enteric or enterogenous cysts, enterocystomas). Described in this case report is an extremely unusual patient, a woman who simultaneously had a retrorectal cyst and an ovarian serous cystadenoma in addition to a long history of misdiagnosis and multiple unsuccessful surgeries.

Conclusions

Coexistence of a retrorectal cyst and a serous cystadenoma is very unusual. Retrorectal cysts are rare entities that remain a difficult diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Misdiagnosis and multiple unsuccessful surgeries are common. Complete surgical removal is the treatment of choice and requires a multidisciplinary approach in complicated cases.

Case Presentation

The patient was a 45-year-old female who presented with back pain, rectal fullness, constipation, and urinary symptoms. Upon her first pregnancy, a cystic pelvic mass had been misdiagnosed as an ovarian cyst. During the following 17 years, she had undergone several ineffective operations. The last CT scan and MRI studies revealed two separate noncalcified, unilocular, cystic lesions with well-defined borders in the retrorectal and retroperitoneal spaces. Two cysts were excised completely by a combined abdominoperineal approach. Pathological assessment revealed a dermoid cyst and an ovarian serous cystadenoma. No complications occurred during the 18 months of follow-up.

Rectum;Ovary;Cyst;Tumor;Epidermoid;Serous Cystadenoma Rectum;Ovary;Cyst;Tumor;Epidermoid;Serous Cystadenoma http://www.ircmj.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=31439 Setareh Soltany Setareh Soltany Cancer Research Center, Department of Surgery, Semnan University of Medical Sciences, Semnan, IR Iran; Cancer Research Center, Department of Surgery, Semnan University of Medical Sciences, Semnan, IR Iran. Tel: +98-9127312407, Fax: +98-2333448950 Cancer Research Center, Department of Surgery, Semnan University of Medical Sciences, Semnan, IR Iran; Cancer Research Center, Department of Surgery, Semnan University of Medical Sciences, Semnan, IR Iran. Tel: +98-9127312407, Fax: +98-2333448950
en 28144463 10.5812/ircmj.36825 Drug Reaction With Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms Induced by Valproic Acid: A Case Report Drug Reaction With Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms Induced by Valproic Acid: A Case Report case-report case-report Conclusions

Only a small number of case reports have described valproic acid-induced DRESS syndrome; therefore, the condition is difficult to prevent. Rechallenge with valproic acid should be avoided in patients with a history of reaction to the drug.

Case Presentation

We report on the case of a 60-year-old man who had been treated with valproic acid some time before being referred to Kowsar Hospital, Semnan, Iran in December 2015. He was given valproic acid 1000 mg PO, and after 20 days, he had developed widespread rashes, fever, esophagitis, cervical lymphadenopathy, and tender hepatomegaly. Laboratory results at Kowsar showed a drop in hemoglobin, in addition to lymphocytosis, thrombocytopenia, and elevated serum transaminases. DRESS was diagnosed, and corticosteroid therapy was initiated. Administration of the culprit drug to the patient was also stopped. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) improved the general condition of the patient.

Introduction

Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome is a rare but life-threatening reaction to drugs such as carbamazepine and allopurinol. The condition is characterized by skin rashes, fever, hematological disturbances, lymphadenopathy, and organ failure, most probably hepatic dysfunction. To date, only a few cases of valproate-induced DRESS syndrome have been reported.

Conclusions

Only a small number of case reports have described valproic acid-induced DRESS syndrome; therefore, the condition is difficult to prevent. Rechallenge with valproic acid should be avoided in patients with a history of reaction to the drug.

Case Presentation

We report on the case of a 60-year-old man who had been treated with valproic acid some time before being referred to Kowsar Hospital, Semnan, Iran in December 2015. He was given valproic acid 1000 mg PO, and after 20 days, he had developed widespread rashes, fever, esophagitis, cervical lymphadenopathy, and tender hepatomegaly. Laboratory results at Kowsar showed a drop in hemoglobin, in addition to lymphocytosis, thrombocytopenia, and elevated serum transaminases. DRESS was diagnosed, and corticosteroid therapy was initiated. Administration of the culprit drug to the patient was also stopped. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) improved the general condition of the patient.

Introduction

Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome is a rare but life-threatening reaction to drugs such as carbamazepine and allopurinol. The condition is characterized by skin rashes, fever, hematological disturbances, lymphadenopathy, and organ failure, most probably hepatic dysfunction. To date, only a few cases of valproate-induced DRESS syndrome have been reported.

Rash;Fever;Liver;Valproic Acid;DRESS Rash;Fever;Liver;Valproic Acid;DRESS http://www.ircmj.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=36825 Mahboubeh Darban Mahboubeh Darban Department of Internal Medicine, Kowsar Hospital, Semnan University of Medical Sciences, Semnan, IR Iran Department of Internal Medicine, Kowsar Hospital, Semnan University of Medical Sciences, Semnan, IR Iran Bahador Bagheri Bahador Bagheri Cancer Research Center and Department of Pharmacology, Semnan University of Medical Sciences, Semnan, IR Iran; Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Semnan University of Medical Sciences, Semnan, IR Iran. Tel: +98-2333448996, Fax: +98-98-2333448999 Cancer Research Center and Department of Pharmacology, Semnan University of Medical Sciences, Semnan, IR Iran; Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Semnan University of Medical Sciences, Semnan, IR Iran. Tel: +98-2333448996, Fax: +98-98-2333448999
en 28144466 10.5812/ircmj.38750 Sphingobacterium multivorum Bacteremia and Acute Meningitis in an Immunocompetent Adult Patient: A Case Report <italic>Sphingobacterium multivorum</italic> Bacteremia and Acute Meningitis in an Immunocompetent Adult Patient: A Case Report case-report case-report Introduction

Sphingobacterium multivorum is a Gram-negative, nonfermentative bacillus that rarely causes disease in humans. In the medical literature, only a few cases of infections caused by this organism have been reported. Almost all the reported cases of this infection were associated with conditions that decrease immunity.

Case Presentation

To the best of our knowledge, we are reporting the first case of bacteremia and acute meningitis caused by S. multivorum in a young immunocompetent adult.

Introduction

Sphingobacterium multivorum is a Gram-negative, nonfermentative bacillus that rarely causes disease in humans. In the medical literature, only a few cases of infections caused by this organism have been reported. Almost all the reported cases of this infection were associated with conditions that decrease immunity.

Case Presentation

To the best of our knowledge, we are reporting the first case of bacteremia and acute meningitis caused by S. multivorum in a young immunocompetent adult.

Immunocompetent;Bacteremia;Meningitis;Sphingobacterium multivorum Immunocompetent;Bacteremia;Meningitis;Sphingobacterium multivorum http://www.ircmj.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=38750 Ali Hassan Abro Ali Hassan Abro Infectious Disease Unit, Rashid Hospital, Dubai, United Arab Emirates; Rashid Hospital Dubai, United Arab Emirates. Tel: +97-143346651 Infectious Disease Unit, Rashid Hospital, Dubai, United Arab Emirates; Rashid Hospital Dubai, United Arab Emirates. Tel: +97-143346651 Mohammad Reza Rahimi Shahmirzadi Mohammad Reza Rahimi Shahmirzadi Infectious Disease Unit, Rashid Hospital, Dubai, United Arab Emirates Infectious Disease Unit, Rashid Hospital, Dubai, United Arab Emirates Layal Mohammed Jasim Layal Mohammed Jasim Infectious Disease Unit, Rashid Hospital, Dubai, United Arab Emirates Infectious Disease Unit, Rashid Hospital, Dubai, United Arab Emirates Samar Badreddine Samar Badreddine Infectious Disease Unit, Rashid Hospital, Dubai, United Arab Emirates Infectious Disease Unit, Rashid Hospital, Dubai, United Arab Emirates Zulfa Al Deesi Zulfa Al Deesi Microbiology Department and Infectious Control Unit, Rashid Hospital Dubai, United Arab Emirates Microbiology Department and Infectious Control Unit, Rashid Hospital Dubai, United Arab Emirates