Iranian Red Crescent Medical Journal Iranian Red Crescent Medical Journal Iran Red Crescent Med J http://www.ircmj.com 2074-1804 2074-1812 10.5812/ircmj en jalali 2017 6 27 gregorian 2017 6 27 15 1
en 10.5812/ircmj.2173 HER2 Ile655Val Single Nucleotide Polymorphism in Patients with Ovarian Cancer HER2 Ile655Val Single Nucleotide Polymorphism in Patients with Ovarian Cancer research-article research-article Background

The association between HER2 Ile655Val single nucleotide polymorphism and cancer is controversial.

Objectives

The aim of our study was to investigate this polymorphism in patients with ovarian cancer.

Patients and Methods

Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes of 107 patients and 130 healthy women. HER2 gene polymorphism was assessed by PCR-RFLP.

Results

No significant difference was observed in genotype and allele frequency between patient and control groups according to HER2 Ile655Val polymorphism. The disease stage, age, and histological type were also not associated with the polymorphism.

Conclusions

our data showed that HER2 Ile655Val single nucleotide polymorphism was not significantly associated with onset, histological type, age, and stage of ovarian cancer in Iranian patients.

Background

The association between HER2 Ile655Val single nucleotide polymorphism and cancer is controversial.

Objectives

The aim of our study was to investigate this polymorphism in patients with ovarian cancer.

Patients and Methods

Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes of 107 patients and 130 healthy women. HER2 gene polymorphism was assessed by PCR-RFLP.

Results

No significant difference was observed in genotype and allele frequency between patient and control groups according to HER2 Ile655Val polymorphism. The disease stage, age, and histological type were also not associated with the polymorphism.

Conclusions

our data showed that HER2 Ile655Val single nucleotide polymorphism was not significantly associated with onset, histological type, age, and stage of ovarian cancer in Iranian patients.

Carcinoma, Endometrioid; HER2; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide Carcinoma, Endometrioid; HER2; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide 1 3 http://www.ircmj.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=2173 Zahra Mojtahedi Zahra Mojtahedi Shiraz Institute for Cancer Research, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Shiraz Institute for Cancer Research, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Nasroolah Erfani Nasroolah Erfani Shiraz Institute for Cancer Research, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Shiraz Institute for Cancer Research, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Mahyar Malekzadeh Mahyar Malekzadeh Shiraz Institute for Cancer Research, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Shiraz Institute for Cancer Research, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Mohammad Reza Haghshenas Mohammad Reza Haghshenas Shiraz Institute for Cancer Research, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Shiraz Institute for Cancer Research, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Abbas Ghaderi Abbas Ghaderi Shiraz Institute for Cancer Research, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Shiraz Institute for Cancer Research, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Alamtaj Samsami Dehaghani Alamtaj Samsami Dehaghani Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-7112303687, samsamia@sums.ac.ir; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-7112303687, samsamia@sums.ac.ir Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-7112303687, samsamia@sums.ac.ir; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-7112303687, samsamia@sums.ac.ir
en 10.5812/ircmj.2282 Intra-familial Transmission of Hepatitis B virus Infection in Zahedan Intra-familial Transmission of Hepatitis B virus Infection in Zahedan research-article research-article Background

The household transmission of hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a major health problem. The prevalence rate of this infection is reported about 11% to 57% among family members of HBsAg carriers.

Objectives

This study was conducted to evaluate serological determinants of chronic hepatitis B infection, especially HBsAg positivity, among family members of asymptomatic HBsAg positive carriers in Zahedan (Southeast of Iran).

Patients and Methods

In a cross-sectional study, data were collected from the total number of 454 HBsAg positive cases and 1817 members of their family by trained interviewers and a validated questionnaire. In addition, blood samples were obtained and titrated to detect serologic markers of hepatitis B. All subjects were recruited following informed consent to the study.

Results

In total, 454 chronic HBsAg carriers (66% male) with mean age of 36 ± 10 years and 1817 of their family members were included in the study. The prevalence rate of HBsAg and HBcAb positivity among household members were 19.3% (n = 351) and 51% (n = 573), respectively. The frequency of HBV markers was different by age groups. The highest prevalence rate of HBsAg (34.9%) and HBcAb (31.9%) positivity were found in the age group of 21-30 years old. Importantly, the mothers of index cases had the highest prevalence of HBsAg positivity compared to their spouses who had the lowest proportion (53.2% vs. 8.4%, P < 0.001).

Conclusions

In family members, HBsAg positivity was four times greater than the general indigenous population. Considering the importance of close contacts for transmission, it was more prevalent in mothers of index cases compared to their spouses, suggesting more efficient mother-to-child than sexually transmission of HBV. It was also more prevalent in those having a history of hepatitis B in their maternal family compared to those with paternal one, probably due to more efficient transmission from infected mothers to children. The lower prevalence of HBsAg positivity in lower age groups could be attributed to vaccination of Iranian infants since 1993 and the screening of HBsAg positive mothers during the last two decades.

Background

The household transmission of hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a major health problem. The prevalence rate of this infection is reported about 11% to 57% among family members of HBsAg carriers.

Objectives

This study was conducted to evaluate serological determinants of chronic hepatitis B infection, especially HBsAg positivity, among family members of asymptomatic HBsAg positive carriers in Zahedan (Southeast of Iran).

Patients and Methods

In a cross-sectional study, data were collected from the total number of 454 HBsAg positive cases and 1817 members of their family by trained interviewers and a validated questionnaire. In addition, blood samples were obtained and titrated to detect serologic markers of hepatitis B. All subjects were recruited following informed consent to the study.

Results

In total, 454 chronic HBsAg carriers (66% male) with mean age of 36 ± 10 years and 1817 of their family members were included in the study. The prevalence rate of HBsAg and HBcAb positivity among household members were 19.3% (n = 351) and 51% (n = 573), respectively. The frequency of HBV markers was different by age groups. The highest prevalence rate of HBsAg (34.9%) and HBcAb (31.9%) positivity were found in the age group of 21-30 years old. Importantly, the mothers of index cases had the highest prevalence of HBsAg positivity compared to their spouses who had the lowest proportion (53.2% vs. 8.4%, P < 0.001).

Conclusions

In family members, HBsAg positivity was four times greater than the general indigenous population. Considering the importance of close contacts for transmission, it was more prevalent in mothers of index cases compared to their spouses, suggesting more efficient mother-to-child than sexually transmission of HBV. It was also more prevalent in those having a history of hepatitis B in their maternal family compared to those with paternal one, probably due to more efficient transmission from infected mothers to children. The lower prevalence of HBsAg positivity in lower age groups could be attributed to vaccination of Iranian infants since 1993 and the screening of HBsAg positive mothers during the last two decades.

Carrier States; Hepatitis B; Transmission; Iran; Prevention and control; HBV Seroprevalence Carrier States; Hepatitis B; Transmission; Iran; Prevention and control; HBV Seroprevalence 4 8 http://www.ircmj.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=2282 Hossein Hatami Hossein Hatami Department of Public Health, School of Health, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Department of Public Health, School of Health, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Masoud Salehi Masoud Salehi Movestmow oosmowestioustvosmcsmsme~ikmnenrumwws{iw}ngrme~ikelac}oowessity of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-5412432848, shahestan@gmail.com; Movestmow oosmowestioustvosmcsmsme~ikmnenrumwws{iw}ngrme~ikelac}oowessity of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-5412432848, shahestan@gmail.com Movestmow oosmowestioustvosmcsmsme~ikmnenrumwws{iw}ngrme~ikelac}oowessity of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-5412432848, shahestan@gmail.com; Movestmow oosmowestioustvosmcsmsme~ikmnenrumwws{iw}ngrme~ikelac}oowessity of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-5412432848, shahestan@gmail.com Esmail Sanei Esmail Sanei Blood Transfusion Research Center, High Institute for Research and Education in Transfusion Medicine, Zahedan Blood Transfusion Center, IR Iran Blood Transfusion Research Center, High Institute for Research and Education in Transfusion Medicine, Zahedan Blood Transfusion Center, IR Iran Soheila Khosravi Soheila Khosravi Blood Transfusion Research Center, High Institute for Research and Education in Transfusion Medicine, Zahedan Blood Transfusion Center, IR Iran Blood Transfusion Research Center, High Institute for Research and Education in Transfusion Medicine, Zahedan Blood Transfusion Center, IR Iran Seyed Moayed Alavian Seyed Moayed Alavian Department of Internal Medicine, Baqiyatollah Medical University, Tehran Hepatitis Center, IR Iran Department of Internal Medicine, Baqiyatollah Medical University, Tehran Hepatitis Center, IR Iran
en 10.5812/ircmj.3406 Successful Management of Total Knee Replacement in a High Responder Hemophilia Patient With a History of Inhibitor Successful Management of Total Knee Replacement in a High Responder Hemophilia Patient With a History of Inhibitor case-report case-report

The development of inhibitors against administered clotting factors may render replacement therapy ineffective for some hemophilia patients. Such patients are therefore at the highest risk of developing arthropathy. Elective orthopedic surgery (EOS) in hemophilic patients having such inhibitors remains a rare, expensive, and difficult surgery, whose management represents a significant challenge. We report the case of a 35-year-old man with a severe form of hemophilia A (factor VIII < 1%), who was suffering from repetitive spontaneous hemarthrosis, especially in his knee joints that had consequently become more susceptible to bleeding. The patient had a history of high levels of factor VIII inhibitor (> 5.0 Bethesda Unit [BU]/ml) as shown by the factor VIII inhibitor assay; therefore, we began treatment with factor VIIa for his mild-to-moderate bleeding (90 µg/kg intravenous bolus injections). The interval between injections varied with the severity of the hemorrhage in each bleeding episode. The inhibitor level reduced to 3.1 BU/ml after three months, to 1.6 BU/ml after six months, and disappeared completely after one year of treatment. We administered factor VIII at a dose of 50 IU/kg every eight hours during the first three post-operative days, then continued administration with a dose of 40 IU/kg every 12 hours for another four days, and observed a very good response to treatment with no bleeding. Recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) is not an inhibitor-removal strategy, but an inhibitor-bypassing product. However, in our patient, the treatment of mild-to-moderate bleeding with short-term use of rFVIIa and no exposure to factor VIII caused a gradual reduction in the inhibitor level over a period of 1 year.

The development of inhibitors against administered clotting factors may render replacement therapy ineffective for some hemophilia patients. Such patients are therefore at the highest risk of developing arthropathy. Elective orthopedic surgery (EOS) in hemophilic patients having such inhibitors remains a rare, expensive, and difficult surgery, whose management represents a significant challenge. We report the case of a 35-year-old man with a severe form of hemophilia A (factor VIII < 1%), who was suffering from repetitive spontaneous hemarthrosis, especially in his knee joints that had consequently become more susceptible to bleeding. The patient had a history of high levels of factor VIII inhibitor (> 5.0 Bethesda Unit [BU]/ml) as shown by the factor VIII inhibitor assay; therefore, we began treatment with factor VIIa for his mild-to-moderate bleeding (90 µg/kg intravenous bolus injections). The interval between injections varied with the severity of the hemorrhage in each bleeding episode. The inhibitor level reduced to 3.1 BU/ml after three months, to 1.6 BU/ml after six months, and disappeared completely after one year of treatment. We administered factor VIII at a dose of 50 IU/kg every eight hours during the first three post-operative days, then continued administration with a dose of 40 IU/kg every 12 hours for another four days, and observed a very good response to treatment with no bleeding. Recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) is not an inhibitor-removal strategy, but an inhibitor-bypassing product. However, in our patient, the treatment of mild-to-moderate bleeding with short-term use of rFVIIa and no exposure to factor VIII caused a gradual reduction in the inhibitor level over a period of 1 year.

Orthopedics; Hemophilia A; Hemophilia B; Inhibitor Orthopedics; Hemophilia A; Hemophilia B; Inhibitor 18 20 http://www.ircmj.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=3406 Roya Dolatkhah Roya Dolatkhah Hematology and Oncology Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Hemophilia and Thalassemia Department, IR Iran Hematology and Oncology Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Hemophilia and Thalassemia Department, IR Iran Mohammad Reza Bazavar Mohammad Reza Bazavar Department of Orthopedic, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-4113859314, dr.bazavar@gmail.com; Department of Orthopedic, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-4113859314, dr.bazavar@gmail.com Department of Orthopedic, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-4113859314, dr.bazavar@gmail.com; Department of Orthopedic, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-4113859314, dr.bazavar@gmail.com Masoud Poureisa Masoud Poureisa Radiology Department, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Radiology Department, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Iraj Asvadi Kermani Iraj Asvadi Kermani Hematology and Oncology Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Hemophilia and Thalassemia Department, IR Iran Hematology and Oncology Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Hemophilia and Thalassemia Department, IR Iran Jalil Vaez Gharamaleki Jalil Vaez Gharamaleki Hematology and Oncology Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Hemophilia and Thalassemia Department, IR Iran Hematology and Oncology Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Hemophilia and Thalassemia Department, IR Iran Zohreh Sanaat Zohreh Sanaat Hematology and Oncology Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Hemophilia and Thalassemia Department, IR Iran Hematology and Oncology Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Hemophilia and Thalassemia Department, IR Iran Jamal Eivazi Ziaei Jamal Eivazi Ziaei Hematology and Oncology Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Hemophilia and Thalassemia Department, IR Iran Hematology and Oncology Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Hemophilia and Thalassemia Department, IR Iran Alireza Nikanfar Alireza Nikanfar Hematology and Oncology Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Hemophilia and Thalassemia Department, IR Iran Hematology and Oncology Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Hemophilia and Thalassemia Department, IR Iran Ali Esfahani Ali Esfahani Hematology and Oncology Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Hemophilia and Thalassemia Department, IR Iran Hematology and Oncology Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Hemophilia and Thalassemia Department, IR Iran Seyed Hadi Chavoshi Seyed Hadi Chavoshi Hematology and Oncology Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Hemophilia and Thalassemia Department, IR Iran Hematology and Oncology Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Hemophilia and Thalassemia Department, IR Iran
en 10.5812/ircmj.3517 The Effect of an intervention based on the PRECEDE- PROCEED Model on preventive behaviors of domestic violence among Iranian high school girls The Effect of an intervention based on the PRECEDE- PROCEED Model on preventive behaviors of domestic violence among Iranian high school girls research-article research-article Background

Domestic violence is one of the major health problems among women. Promoting preventive behaviors of domestic violence among women and girls can play crucial role in reducing this health problem.

Objectives

This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of an intervention based on PRECEDE-PROCEED Model on preventive behaviors of domestic violence among Iranian high school girls.

Patients and Methods

An interventional study was completed during 2010-2011 in 10 high schools in the district 17 of Tehran municipality with 510 female students. We used the components of the PRECEDE-PROCEED Model for planning, implementation and evaluation of the program. Based on the results of need assessment, an appropriate environmental and educational intervention was implemented in the intervention group. Changes in predisposing, reinforcing, enabling factors and especially preventive behaviors immediately and two months after the intervention activities were assessed by questionnaires based on PRECEDE-PROCEED Model.

Results

The intervention had significantly positive effect on predisposing, enabling and reinforcing factors immediately and two months after the intervention (P < 0.05). Repeated measures Analysis of variance showed a significant positive increase in preventive behaviors score in the intervention group from baseline to two months.

Conclusions

The PRECEDE-PROCEED Model can be applied as a conceptual framework for identifying the relevant behavioral and environmental risk factors associated with domestic violence. Development and implementation the skills-based education using this model can lead to the promotion of preventive behaviors of domestic violence and reduction in domestic violence cases.

Background

Domestic violence is one of the major health problems among women. Promoting preventive behaviors of domestic violence among women and girls can play crucial role in reducing this health problem.

Objectives

This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of an intervention based on PRECEDE-PROCEED Model on preventive behaviors of domestic violence among Iranian high school girls.

Patients and Methods

An interventional study was completed during 2010-2011 in 10 high schools in the district 17 of Tehran municipality with 510 female students. We used the components of the PRECEDE-PROCEED Model for planning, implementation and evaluation of the program. Based on the results of need assessment, an appropriate environmental and educational intervention was implemented in the intervention group. Changes in predisposing, reinforcing, enabling factors and especially preventive behaviors immediately and two months after the intervention activities were assessed by questionnaires based on PRECEDE-PROCEED Model.

Results

The intervention had significantly positive effect on predisposing, enabling and reinforcing factors immediately and two months after the intervention (P < 0.05). Repeated measures Analysis of variance showed a significant positive increase in preventive behaviors score in the intervention group from baseline to two months.

Conclusions

The PRECEDE-PROCEED Model can be applied as a conceptual framework for identifying the relevant behavioral and environmental risk factors associated with domestic violence. Development and implementation the skills-based education using this model can lead to the promotion of preventive behaviors of domestic violence and reduction in domestic violence cases.

Domestic Violence; Health Education; Health Promotion; Iran Domestic Violence; Health Education; Health Promotion; Iran 21 8 http://www.ircmj.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=3517 Yalda Soleiman Ekhtiari Yalda Soleiman Ekhtiari Department of Health Education and Promotion, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran +98-2188989128 , shojaei@tums.ac.ir Department of Health Education and Promotion, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran +98-2188989128 , shojaei@tums.ac.ir Davoud Shojaeizadeh Davoud Shojaeizadeh Department of Health Education and Promotion, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran +98-2188989128 , shojaei@tums.ac.ir Department of Health Education and Promotion, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran +98-2188989128 , shojaei@tums.ac.ir Abbas Rahimi Foroushani Abbas Rahimi Foroushani Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran Fazlollah Ghofranipour Fazlollah Ghofranipour Department of Health Education, Tarbiat Modares University, Iran Department of Health Education, Tarbiat Modares University, Iran
en 10.5812/ircmj.3804 Comparison of Colonic J-pouch and Straight Coloanal anastomosis after Low Anterior Resection Comparison of Colonic J-pouch and Straight Coloanal anastomosis after Low Anterior Resection research-article research-article Conclusions

CPAA provided not only better functional results than SCAA, but also improved quality of life, thus may be the better choice.

Background

The tendency towards sphincter preserving for low rectal cancers with low anterior resection, has led to the technique of straight coloanal anastomosis (SCAA) or colonic J-pouch anal anastomosis (CPAA).

Objectives

The aim of our study was to compare functional outcomes, complication rates and quality of life (QoL) after LAR with either a straight or colonic J pouch anastomosis.

Patients and Methods

In 88 patients with rectal tumors located in lower third, who were candidate for LAR with coloanal anastomosis. They were divided for reconstruction using either SCAA (n= 47) or CPAA (n= 41) from January 2007 to May 2009. Functional results were assessed after closure of temporary loop ileostomy, 6 months postoperatively. Quality of life (QoL) was measured using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30.

Results

The two groups were matched for gender, age, and preoperative chemotherapy and radiotherapy. There were no significant differences between the SCAA and CPAA groups relative to anastomotic leakage. Among patients with CPAA, the mean of 24 hours bowel movements, daytime bowel movements, incontinence scores, and incidence of urgency were significantly lower than those in the SCAA group. Also, patients with a CPAA had a significantly better quality of life.

Conclusions

CPAA provided not only better functional results than SCAA, but also improved quality of life, thus may be the better choice.

Background

The tendency towards sphincter preserving for low rectal cancers with low anterior resection, has led to the technique of straight coloanal anastomosis (SCAA) or colonic J-pouch anal anastomosis (CPAA).

Objectives

The aim of our study was to compare functional outcomes, complication rates and quality of life (QoL) after LAR with either a straight or colonic J pouch anastomosis.

Patients and Methods

In 88 patients with rectal tumors located in lower third, who were candidate for LAR with coloanal anastomosis. They were divided for reconstruction using either SCAA (n= 47) or CPAA (n= 41) from January 2007 to May 2009. Functional results were assessed after closure of temporary loop ileostomy, 6 months postoperatively. Quality of life (QoL) was measured using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30.

Results

The two groups were matched for gender, age, and preoperative chemotherapy and radiotherapy. There were no significant differences between the SCAA and CPAA groups relative to anastomotic leakage. Among patients with CPAA, the mean of 24 hours bowel movements, daytime bowel movements, incontinence scores, and incidence of urgency were significantly lower than those in the SCAA group. Also, patients with a CPAA had a significantly better quality of life.

Rectal Cancer ; Straight Coloanal Anastomosis ; Colonic J-Pouch Anal Anastomosis ; Low Anterior Resection ; Quality of Life Rectal Cancer ; Straight Coloanal Anastomosis ; Colonic J-Pouch Anal Anastomosis ; Low Anterior Resection ; Quality of Life 32 5 http://www.ircmj.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=3804 Shaban Mehrvarz Shaban Mehrvarz Department of General Surgery, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Iran +98-2188033539 , mehrvarz@bmsu.ac.ir ; Department of General Surgery, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Iran +98-2188033539 , mehrvarz@bmsu.ac.ir Department of General Surgery, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Iran +98-2188033539 , mehrvarz@bmsu.ac.ir ; Department of General Surgery, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Iran +98-2188033539 , mehrvarz@bmsu.ac.ir Seyed Mohsen Towliat Seyed Mohsen Towliat Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Research Center for Gastroenterology and Liver Disease, Iran Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Research Center for Gastroenterology and Liver Disease, Iran Hassan ali Mohebbi Hassan ali Mohebbi Department of General Surgery, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Iran +98-2188033539 , mehrvarz@bmsu.ac.ir Department of General Surgery, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Iran +98-2188033539 , mehrvarz@bmsu.ac.ir Saieed Derakhshani Saieed Derakhshani Department of General Surgery, Chamran Hospital, Iran Department of General Surgery, Chamran Hospital, Iran Mahdi Abavisani Mahdi Abavisani Department of General Surgery, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Iran +98-2188033539 , mehrvarz@bmsu.ac.ir Department of General Surgery, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Iran +98-2188033539 , mehrvarz@bmsu.ac.ir
en 10.5812/ircmj.4024 Sequence Characterization of cDNA Sequence of Encoding of an Antimicrobial Peptide With No Disulfide Bridge from the Iranian Mesobuthus Eupeus Venomous Glands Sequence Characterization of cDNA Sequence of Encoding of an Antimicrobial Peptide With No Disulfide Bridge from the Iranian Mesobuthus Eupeus Venomous Glands research-article research-article Objectives

In this study, we reported the identification of a cDNA sequence encoding cysteine-free antimicrobial peptides isolated from venomous glands of this species.

Materials and Methods

Total RNA was extracted from the Iranian mesobuthus eupeus venom glands, and cDNA was synthesized by using the modified oligo (dT). The cDNA was used as the template for applying Semi-nested RT- PCR technique. PCR Products were used for direct nucleotide sequencing and the results were compared with Gen Bank database.

Results

A 213 BP cDNA fragment encoding the entire coding region of an antimicrobial toxin from the Iranian scorpion M. Eupeus venom glands were isolated. The full-length sequence of the coding region was 210 BP contained an open reading frame of 70 amino with a predicted molecular mass of 7970.48 Da and theoretical Pi of 9.10. The open reading frame consists of 210 BP encoding a precursor of 70 amino acid residues, including a signal peptide of 23 residues a propertied of 7 residues, and a mature peptide of 34 residues with no disulfide bridge. The peptide has detectable sequence identity to the Lesser Asian mesobuthus eupeus MeVAMP-2 (98%), MeVAMP-9 (60%) and several previously described AMPs from other scorpion venoms including mesobuthus martensii (94%) and buthus occitanus Israelis (82%).

Conclusions

The secondary structure of the peptide mainly consisted of α-helical structure which was generally conserved by previously reported scorpion counterparts. The phylogenetic analysis showed that the Iranian MeAMP-like toxin was similar but not identical with that of venom antimicrobial peptides from lesser Asian scorpion mesobuthus eupeus.

Background

Scorpion venom glands produce some antimicrobial peptides (AMP) that can rapidly kill a broad range of microbes and have additional activities that impact on the quality and effectiveness of innate responses and inflammation.

Objectives

In this study, we reported the identification of a cDNA sequence encoding cysteine-free antimicrobial peptides isolated from venomous glands of this species.

Materials and Methods

Total RNA was extracted from the Iranian mesobuthus eupeus venom glands, and cDNA was synthesized by using the modified oligo (dT). The cDNA was used as the template for applying Semi-nested RT- PCR technique. PCR Products were used for direct nucleotide sequencing and the results were compared with Gen Bank database.

Results

A 213 BP cDNA fragment encoding the entire coding region of an antimicrobial toxin from the Iranian scorpion M. Eupeus venom glands were isolated. The full-length sequence of the coding region was 210 BP contained an open reading frame of 70 amino with a predicted molecular mass of 7970.48 Da and theoretical Pi of 9.10. The open reading frame consists of 210 BP encoding a precursor of 70 amino acid residues, including a signal peptide of 23 residues a propertied of 7 residues, and a mature peptide of 34 residues with no disulfide bridge. The peptide has detectable sequence identity to the Lesser Asian mesobuthus eupeus MeVAMP-2 (98%), MeVAMP-9 (60%) and several previously described AMPs from other scorpion venoms including mesobuthus martensii (94%) and buthus occitanus Israelis (82%).

Conclusions

The secondary structure of the peptide mainly consisted of α-helical structure which was generally conserved by previously reported scorpion counterparts. The phylogenetic analysis showed that the Iranian MeAMP-like toxin was similar but not identical with that of venom antimicrobial peptides from lesser Asian scorpion mesobuthus eupeus.

Background

Scorpion venom glands produce some antimicrobial peptides (AMP) that can rapidly kill a broad range of microbes and have additional activities that impact on the quality and effectiveness of innate responses and inflammation.

Scorpions;Venoms;Antimicrobial Peptide Pharbitis;Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction;Meucin-25, Mesobuthus Eupeus Scorpions;Venoms;Antimicrobial Peptide Pharbitis;Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction;Meucin-25, Mesobuthus Eupeus 36 41 http://www.ircmj.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=4024 Ahmad Farajzadeh-Sheikh Ahmad Farajzadeh-Sheikh Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Abbas Jolodar Abbas Jolodar Department of Basic Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, IR Iran +98-6113330073, jolodara@scu.ac.ir; Department of Basic Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, IR Iran +98-6113330073, jolodara@scu.ac.ir Department of Basic Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, IR Iran +98-6113330073, jolodara@scu.ac.ir; Department of Basic Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, IR Iran +98-6113330073, jolodara@scu.ac.ir Shamsedin Ghaemmaghami Shamsedin Ghaemmaghami Razi Vaccine and Serum Research Institute, IR Iran Razi Vaccine and Serum Research Institute, IR Iran
en 10.5812/ircmj.4122 Assessing the Effect of Quantitative and Qualitative Predictors on Gastric Cancer Individuals Survival Using Hierarchical Artificial Neural Network Models Assessing the Effect of Quantitative and Qualitative Predictors on Gastric Cancer Individuals Survival Using Hierarchical Artificial Neural Network Models research-article research-article Results

Survival probabilities at different times were determined using the Cox proportional hazards and a neural network with three nodes in the hidden layer; the ratios of standard errors with these two methods to the Kaplan-Meier method were 1.1593 and 1.0071, respectively, revealed a significant difference between Cox and Kaplan-Meier (P < 0.05) and no significant difference between Cox and the neural network, and the neural network and the standard (Kaplan-Meier), as well as better accuracy for the neural network (with 3 nodes in the hidden layer). Probabilities of survival were calculated using three neural network models with 3, 5, and 7 nodes in the hidden layer, and it has been observed that none of the predictions was significantly different from results with the Kaplan-Meier method and they appeared more comparable towards the last months (fifth year). However, we observed better accuracy using the neural network with 5 nodes in the hidden layer. Using the Cox proportional hazards and a neural network with 3 nodes in the hidden layer, we found enhanced accuracy with the neural network model.

Background

There are numerous unanswered questions in the application of artificial neural network models for analysis of survival data. In most studies, independent variables have been studied as qualitative dichotomous variables, and results of using discrete and continuous quantitative, ordinal, or multinomial categorical predictive variables in these models are not well understood in comparison to conventional models.

Objectives

This study was designed and conducted to examine the application of these models in order to determine the survival of gastric cancer patients, in comparison to the Cox proportional hazards model.

Conclusions

Neural networks can provide more accurate predictions for survival probabilities compared to the Cox proportional hazards mode, especially now that advances in computer sciences have eliminated limitations associated with complex computations. It is not recommended in order to adding too many hidden layer nodes because sample size related effects can reduce the accuracy. We recommend increasing the number of nodes to a point that increased accuracy continues (decrease in mean standard error), however increasing nodes should cease when a change in this trend is observed.

Patients and Methods

We studied the postoperative survival of 330 gastric cancer patients who suffered surgery at a surgical unit of the Iran Cancer Institute over a five-year period. Covariates of age, gender, history of substance abuse, cancer site, type of pathology, presence of metastasis, stage, and number of complementary treatments were entered in the models, and survival probabilities were calculated at 6, 12, 18, 24, 36, 48, and 60 months using the Cox proportional hazards and neural network models. We estimated coefficients of the Cox model and the weights in the neural network (with 3, 5, and 7 nodes in the hidden layer) in the training group, and used them to derive predictions in the study group. Predictions with these two methods were compared with those of the Kaplan-Meier product limit estimator as the gold standard. Comparisons were performed with the Friedman and Kruskal-Wallis tests.

Results

Survival probabilities at different times were determined using the Cox proportional hazards and a neural network with three nodes in the hidden layer; the ratios of standard errors with these two methods to the Kaplan-Meier method were 1.1593 and 1.0071, respectively, revealed a significant difference between Cox and Kaplan-Meier (P < 0.05) and no significant difference between Cox and the neural network, and the neural network and the standard (Kaplan-Meier), as well as better accuracy for the neural network (with 3 nodes in the hidden layer). Probabilities of survival were calculated using three neural network models with 3, 5, and 7 nodes in the hidden layer, and it has been observed that none of the predictions was significantly different from results with the Kaplan-Meier method and they appeared more comparable towards the last months (fifth year). However, we observed better accuracy using the neural network with 5 nodes in the hidden layer. Using the Cox proportional hazards and a neural network with 3 nodes in the hidden layer, we found enhanced accuracy with the neural network model.

Background

There are numerous unanswered questions in the application of artificial neural network models for analysis of survival data. In most studies, independent variables have been studied as qualitative dichotomous variables, and results of using discrete and continuous quantitative, ordinal, or multinomial categorical predictive variables in these models are not well understood in comparison to conventional models.

Objectives

This study was designed and conducted to examine the application of these models in order to determine the survival of gastric cancer patients, in comparison to the Cox proportional hazards model.

Conclusions

Neural networks can provide more accurate predictions for survival probabilities compared to the Cox proportional hazards mode, especially now that advances in computer sciences have eliminated limitations associated with complex computations. It is not recommended in order to adding too many hidden layer nodes because sample size related effects can reduce the accuracy. We recommend increasing the number of nodes to a point that increased accuracy continues (decrease in mean standard error), however increasing nodes should cease when a change in this trend is observed.

Patients and Methods

We studied the postoperative survival of 330 gastric cancer patients who suffered surgery at a surgical unit of the Iran Cancer Institute over a five-year period. Covariates of age, gender, history of substance abuse, cancer site, type of pathology, presence of metastasis, stage, and number of complementary treatments were entered in the models, and survival probabilities were calculated at 6, 12, 18, 24, 36, 48, and 60 months using the Cox proportional hazards and neural network models. We estimated coefficients of the Cox model and the weights in the neural network (with 3, 5, and 7 nodes in the hidden layer) in the training group, and used them to derive predictions in the study group. Predictions with these two methods were compared with those of the Kaplan-Meier product limit estimator as the gold standard. Comparisons were performed with the Friedman and Kruskal-Wallis tests.

Survival;Life Expectancy;Proportional Hazards Model;Neural Networks Survival;Life Expectancy;Proportional Hazards Model;Neural Networks 42 8 http://www.ircmj.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=4122 Zohreh Amiri Zohreh Amiri Department Of Basic Sciences, National Nutrition and Food Technology Research Institute, Faculty of Nutrition Sciences and Food Technology, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Department Of Basic Sciences, National Nutrition and Food Technology Research Institute, Faculty of Nutrition Sciences and Food Technology, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Kazem Mohammad Kazem Mohammad Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-2188989126, zeraatih@tums.ac.ir Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-2188989126, zeraatih@tums.ac.ir Mahmood Mahmoudi Mahmood Mahmoudi Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-2188989126, zeraatih@tums.ac.ir Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-2188989126, zeraatih@tums.ac.ir Mahbubeh Parsaeian Mahbubeh Parsaeian Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-2188989126, zeraatih@tums.ac.ir Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-2188989126, zeraatih@tums.ac.ir
en 10.5812/ircmj.4322 Long-Term Results of stereotactic Brachytherapy (Temporary 125Iodine Seeds) for the Treatment of Low-Grade Astrocytoma (Grade II) Long-Term Results of stereotactic Brachytherapy (Temporary <sup>125</sup>Iodine Seeds) for the Treatment of Low-Grade Astrocytoma (Grade II) research-article research-article Conclusions

The stereotactic brachytherapy for patients with circumscribed and relatively small size tumors appears to be a safe, feasible, and minimally-invasive treatment.

Results

Thirteen patients were male and 16 were female, with the median age of 29 years (range, 2.5 – 64 years). The median follow-up was 95 (range, 6 – 240) months. Based on Pignatti classification, 10 patients were at low- and 19 patients at high-risk. The median overall as well as progression-free survivals for patients were 135 months (95% confidence interval: 76 – 194) and 96 months (95% confidence interval: 1 – 199), respectively. Five- and 10-year progression-free survivals were 41.4 % and 34.5 %, respectively, and the 5- and 10-year overall survivals were 65.5 % and 44.8%, respectively. Progression-free survival was not significantly higher in smaller size tumors (P = 0.224), nor for spherical versus non-spherical tumors (P = 0.307). There was no treatment-related morbidity after stereotactic brachytherapy, and no radiogenic complications occurred during the follow-up period. Mortality due to tumor progression occurred in 4 patients (14%), and 11 patients were alive at the last follow-up.

Objectives

The purpose of this study was to evaluate disease control and survival after stereotactic brachytherapy in patients with circumscribed and relatively small size tumors.

Materials and Methods

A retrospective review of 29 patients, treated between 1991 and 2011, was conducted to evaluate survival, complications, and local disease control after stereotactic brachytherapy. They belonged to a larger group of 48 cases with low-grade gliomas, treated with stereotactic brachytherapy. The demographic and clinical characteristics in patients including age, sex, and survival time were extracted from records.

Background

Treatment of low-grade astrocytoma (WHO grade II) (LGA II) remains a challenge. There is limited information regarding the long-term effects of stereotactic brachytherapy (SBT) (temporary 125Iodine seeds) on patients with LGA II.

Conclusions

The stereotactic brachytherapy for patients with circumscribed and relatively small size tumors appears to be a safe, feasible, and minimally-invasive treatment.

Results

Thirteen patients were male and 16 were female, with the median age of 29 years (range, 2.5 – 64 years). The median follow-up was 95 (range, 6 – 240) months. Based on Pignatti classification, 10 patients were at low- and 19 patients at high-risk. The median overall as well as progression-free survivals for patients were 135 months (95% confidence interval: 76 – 194) and 96 months (95% confidence interval: 1 – 199), respectively. Five- and 10-year progression-free survivals were 41.4 % and 34.5 %, respectively, and the 5- and 10-year overall survivals were 65.5 % and 44.8%, respectively. Progression-free survival was not significantly higher in smaller size tumors (P = 0.224), nor for spherical versus non-spherical tumors (P = 0.307). There was no treatment-related morbidity after stereotactic brachytherapy, and no radiogenic complications occurred during the follow-up period. Mortality due to tumor progression occurred in 4 patients (14%), and 11 patients were alive at the last follow-up.

Objectives

The purpose of this study was to evaluate disease control and survival after stereotactic brachytherapy in patients with circumscribed and relatively small size tumors.

Materials and Methods

A retrospective review of 29 patients, treated between 1991 and 2011, was conducted to evaluate survival, complications, and local disease control after stereotactic brachytherapy. They belonged to a larger group of 48 cases with low-grade gliomas, treated with stereotactic brachytherapy. The demographic and clinical characteristics in patients including age, sex, and survival time were extracted from records.

Background

Treatment of low-grade astrocytoma (WHO grade II) (LGA II) remains a challenge. There is limited information regarding the long-term effects of stereotactic brachytherapy (SBT) (temporary 125Iodine seeds) on patients with LGA II.

Survival;Long-Term;Astrocytoma;Brachytherapy Survival;Long-Term;Astrocytoma;Brachytherapy 49 57 http://www.ircmj.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=4322 Sohrab Shahzadi Sohrab Shahzadi Department of Neurosurgery, [mamiloswmmhwmnu~i~ez{tyton Medical Science, IR Iran +98-2177558081, parisa.azimi@gmail.com Department of Neurosurgery, [mamiloswmmhwmnu~i~ez{tyton Medical Science, IR Iran +98-2177558081, parisa.azimi@gmail.com Parisa Azimi Parisa Azimi Department of Neurosurgery, [mamiloswmmhwmnu~i~ez{tyton Medical Science, IR Iran +98-2177558081, parisa.azimi@gmail.com; Department of Neurosurgery, [mamiloswmmhwmnu~i~ez{tyton Medical Science, IR Iran +98-2177558081, parisa.azimi@gmail.com Department of Neurosurgery, [mamiloswmmhwmnu~i~ez{tyton Medical Science, IR Iran +98-2177558081, parisa.azimi@gmail.com; Department of Neurosurgery, [mamiloswmmhwmnu~i~ez{tyton Medical Science, IR Iran +98-2177558081, parisa.azimi@gmail.com Khosrow Parsa Khosrow Parsa Department of Neurosurgery, Firozgar Hospital, IR Iran Department of Neurosurgery, Firozgar Hospital, IR Iran
en 10.5812/ircmj.4722 The Oncolytic Effect of Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) in Human Skin Cancer Cell Line, A431 The Oncolytic Effect of Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) in Human Skin Cancer Cell Line, A431 research-article research-article Conclusions

This study delineated the beneficial role of RSV for growth regulation of skin cancer cells and highlighted the involvement of RSV in the induction of apoptosis in A431 cells. These findings might conduct evidence into the oncolytic properties of RSV in the skin cancer. Further studies are required to indicate intracellular targets for RSV-induced apoptosis in skin cancer cells.

Results

The results indicated that A431 cell growth was inhibited following infection by RSV in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The most growth inhibitory effect of RSV was occurred at the MOI of 3, and 48 hour after infection. The inhibitory effect of RSV on the cell growth was accompanied by the induction of apoptosis in the skin cancer cells. The percentages of early and late apoptotic cells were increased following exposure to RSV in a concentration- and time-dependent manner.

Materials and Methods

Plaque assay was used to determine RSV titers. The cytotoxic effect of RSV in A431 (skin carcinoma cell line) was determined using MTT assay. The detection of apoptosis was performed via Annexin-V-FITC staining method and analyzed with flow cytometry.

Background

Oncolytic viruses have become of noticeable interest as a novel biological approach for selectively infecting cancer cells and triggering apoptosis in a number of malignant cells. Many researches are devoted to characterize more viruses with oncolytic properties.

Objectives

Evidences on the oncolytic feature of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) are conflicting; therefore, this study was designed to elucidate the possible role of RSV on the modulation of cell growth and apoptosis in the skin cancer cells.

Conclusions

This study delineated the beneficial role of RSV for growth regulation of skin cancer cells and highlighted the involvement of RSV in the induction of apoptosis in A431 cells. These findings might conduct evidence into the oncolytic properties of RSV in the skin cancer. Further studies are required to indicate intracellular targets for RSV-induced apoptosis in skin cancer cells.

Results

The results indicated that A431 cell growth was inhibited following infection by RSV in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The most growth inhibitory effect of RSV was occurred at the MOI of 3, and 48 hour after infection. The inhibitory effect of RSV on the cell growth was accompanied by the induction of apoptosis in the skin cancer cells. The percentages of early and late apoptotic cells were increased following exposure to RSV in a concentration- and time-dependent manner.

Materials and Methods

Plaque assay was used to determine RSV titers. The cytotoxic effect of RSV in A431 (skin carcinoma cell line) was determined using MTT assay. The detection of apoptosis was performed via Annexin-V-FITC staining method and analyzed with flow cytometry.

Background

Oncolytic viruses have become of noticeable interest as a novel biological approach for selectively infecting cancer cells and triggering apoptosis in a number of malignant cells. Many researches are devoted to characterize more viruses with oncolytic properties.

Objectives

Evidences on the oncolytic feature of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) are conflicting; therefore, this study was designed to elucidate the possible role of RSV on the modulation of cell growth and apoptosis in the skin cancer cells.

Oncolytic Viruses;Apoptosis;Skin Neoplasms;Flow Cytometry Oncolytic Viruses;Apoptosis;Skin Neoplasms;Flow Cytometry 62 7 http://www.ircmj.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=4722 Vahid Salimi Vahid Salimi Department of Virology, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box 6446, IR Iran +98-2188962343, mokhtari@sina.tums.ac.ir Department of Virology, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box 6446, IR Iran +98-2188962343, mokhtari@sina.tums.ac.ir Masoumeh Tavakoli Yaraki Masoumeh Tavakoli Yaraki Department of Clinical Biochemistry, School of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, IR Iran Department of Clinical Biochemistry, School of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, IR Iran Mahmood Mahmoodi Mahmood Mahmoodi Department of Biostatic and Epidemiology, School of Public Health Tehran University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Department of Biostatic and Epidemiology, School of Public Health Tehran University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Shahram Shahabi Shahram Shahabi Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, Urmia University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, Urmia University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Mohammad Javad Gharagozlou Mohammad Javad Gharagozlou Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tehran, IR Iran Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tehran, IR Iran Fazel Shokri Fazel Shokri Department of Immunology, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Department of Immunology, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Talat Mokhtari Azad Talat Mokhtari Azad Department of Virology, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box 6446, IR Iran +98-2188962343, mokhtari@sina.tums.ac.ir; Department of Virology, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box 6446, IR Iran +98-2188962343, mokhtari@sina.tums.ac.ir Department of Virology, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box 6446, IR Iran +98-2188962343, mokhtari@sina.tums.ac.ir; Department of Virology, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box 6446, IR Iran +98-2188962343, mokhtari@sina.tums.ac.ir
en 10.5812/ircmj.4989 In vitro Cytotoxic and Antimicrobial Activity of Essential Oil From Satureja Intermedia In vitro Cytotoxic and Antimicrobial Activity of Essential Oil From Satureja Intermedia research-article research-article Background

Many members of the genus Satureja have aromatic and medicinal characteristics. Objectives

Results

Thymol (34.5%), γ-terpinene (18.2%) and ρ-cymene (10.5%) were the main components of the essential oil. The toxicological study on 5637 and KYSE cell lines showed IC50 values of 156 μg/ml. The essential oil exhibited considerable antimicrobial activity on tested bacteria and fungi.

Materials and Methods

The essential oil was isolated by hydrodistillation and analyzed by combination of capillary GC-FID and GC-MS. The in vitro toxicological study was based on the MTT cytotoxicity assay and antimicrobial activity of the essential oil was studied according to the disc diffusion method and MIC value.

Objectives

The purpose of the present work was to determine cytotoxic activity of the essential oil of S. intermedia CA Mey (Lamiaceae) on two human cancerous cell lines and its in vitro inhibitory effects against 11 pathogenic bacteria and fungi as well.

Conclusions

From the results of the present study, it may be concluded that the essential oil of S. intermedia and its major constitutes are interesting in antibacterial and anticancer applications.

Background

Many members of the genus Satureja have aromatic and medicinal characteristics. Objectives

Results

Thymol (34.5%), γ-terpinene (18.2%) and ρ-cymene (10.5%) were the main components of the essential oil. The toxicological study on 5637 and KYSE cell lines showed IC50 values of 156 μg/ml. The essential oil exhibited considerable antimicrobial activity on tested bacteria and fungi.

Materials and Methods

The essential oil was isolated by hydrodistillation and analyzed by combination of capillary GC-FID and GC-MS. The in vitro toxicological study was based on the MTT cytotoxicity assay and antimicrobial activity of the essential oil was studied according to the disc diffusion method and MIC value.

Objectives

The purpose of the present work was to determine cytotoxic activity of the essential oil of S. intermedia CA Mey (Lamiaceae) on two human cancerous cell lines and its in vitro inhibitory effects against 11 pathogenic bacteria and fungi as well.

Conclusions

From the results of the present study, it may be concluded that the essential oil of S. intermedia and its major constitutes are interesting in antibacterial and anticancer applications.

Satureja;Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry;Thymol Satureja;Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry;Thymol 70 4 http://www.ircmj.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=4989 Iman Sadeghi Iman Sadeghi Department of Genetics, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, IR Iran Department of Genetics, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, IR Iran Morteza Yousefzadi Morteza Yousefzadi Department of Biology, Faculty of Basic Sciences, Hormozgan University, IR Iran +98-9121886139, morteza110110@gmail.com; Department of Biology, Faculty of Basic Sciences, Hormozgan University, IR Iran +98-9121886139, morteza110110@gmail.com Department of Biology, Faculty of Basic Sciences, Hormozgan University, IR Iran +98-9121886139, morteza110110@gmail.com; Department of Biology, Faculty of Basic Sciences, Hormozgan University, IR Iran +98-9121886139, morteza110110@gmail.com Mehrdad Behmanesh Mehrdad Behmanesh Department of Genetics, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, IR Iran Department of Genetics, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, IR Iran Mozafar Sharifi Mozafar Sharifi Department of Plant Biology, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, IR Iran Department of Plant Biology, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, IR Iran Aiuob Moradi Aiuob Moradi Agricultural and Natural Resources Research Center, IR Iran Agricultural and Natural Resources Research Center, IR Iran
en 10.5812/ircmj.6252 Influenza Virus-like Particle Containing Two Different Subtypes of Hemagglutinin Confers Protection in Mice Against Lethal Challenge With A/PR8 (H1N1) and A/HK (H3N2) Viruses Influenza Virus-like Particle Containing Two Different Subtypes of Hemagglutinin Confers Protection in Mice Against Lethal Challenge With A/PR8 (H1N1) and A/HK (H3N2) Viruses research-article research-article Background

Preventing the seasonal or pandemic outbreak of influenza can be powerful and cost-effective.

Objectives

In this study, we constructed a novel virus-like particle (VLP) platform that contains two hemagglutinin (HA) subtypes and evaluated immunogenicity of constructed VLP in mice.

Materials and Methods

This recombinant candidate vaccine model resulted in the expression of two HAs of H1N1 and H3N2 subtypes co-localized within a VLP. Following infection of insect cells with recombinant baculovirus co-expressing H1, H3 and M1 proteins, VLPs with size of 80–120 nm were self-assembled, budding, and released into the insect culture medium. The resulting VLPs which contained two different subtypes of hemagglutinin were purified by ultracentrifugation. The immunogenicity of VLPs was evaluated in mice following immunization.

Results

Our data showed that vaccination using VLPs elicited robust levels of serum IgG, and viral neutralizing antibodies against A/PR8 (H1N1) and A/HK (H3N2) viruses. Following challenge with lethal dose of A/PR8 (H1N1) and A/HK (H3N2), vaccinated mice were protected, displaying no sign of weight loss and mortality compared to non-vaccinated control mice.

Conclusions

VLPs can serve as a promising vaccination strategy to control influenza virus.

Background

Preventing the seasonal or pandemic outbreak of influenza can be powerful and cost-effective.

Objectives

In this study, we constructed a novel virus-like particle (VLP) platform that contains two hemagglutinin (HA) subtypes and evaluated immunogenicity of constructed VLP in mice.

Materials and Methods

This recombinant candidate vaccine model resulted in the expression of two HAs of H1N1 and H3N2 subtypes co-localized within a VLP. Following infection of insect cells with recombinant baculovirus co-expressing H1, H3 and M1 proteins, VLPs with size of 80–120 nm were self-assembled, budding, and released into the insect culture medium. The resulting VLPs which contained two different subtypes of hemagglutinin were purified by ultracentrifugation. The immunogenicity of VLPs was evaluated in mice following immunization.

Results

Our data showed that vaccination using VLPs elicited robust levels of serum IgG, and viral neutralizing antibodies against A/PR8 (H1N1) and A/HK (H3N2) viruses. Following challenge with lethal dose of A/PR8 (H1N1) and A/HK (H3N2), vaccinated mice were protected, displaying no sign of weight loss and mortality compared to non-vaccinated control mice.

Conclusions

VLPs can serve as a promising vaccination strategy to control influenza virus.

Orthomyxoviridae;Virus-like particles;Influenza Vaccines Orthomyxoviridae;Virus-like particles;Influenza Vaccines 75 82 http://www.ircmj.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=6252 Farhad Rezaei Farhad Rezaei Department of Virology, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-2188962343 , mokhtari@tums.ac.ir Department of Virology, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-2188962343 , mokhtari@tums.ac.ir Abbas Mirshafiey Abbas Mirshafiey Department of Immunology, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Department of Immunology, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Shohreh Shahmahmoodi Shohreh Shahmahmoodi Department of Virology, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-2188962343 , mokhtari@tums.ac.ir Department of Virology, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-2188962343 , mokhtari@tums.ac.ir Zabihollah Shoja Zabihollah Shoja Department of Virology, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-2188962343 , mokhtari@tums.ac.ir Department of Virology, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-2188962343 , mokhtari@tums.ac.ir Nastaran Ghavami Nastaran Ghavami Department of Virology, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-2188962343 , mokhtari@tums.ac.ir Department of Virology, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-2188962343 , mokhtari@tums.ac.ir Talat Mokhtari-Azad Talat Mokhtari-Azad Department of Virology, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-2188962343 , mokhtari@tums.ac.ir; Department of Virology, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-2188962343 , mokhtari@tums.ac.ir Department of Virology, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-2188962343 , mokhtari@tums.ac.ir; Department of Virology, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-2188962343 , mokhtari@tums.ac.ir
en 10.5812/ircmj.4401 The Prevalence of Tb in HIV Patients and Risk Factor With Frequent Referral (Iran, 2009-10) The Prevalence of Tb in HIV Patients and Risk Factor With Frequent Referral (Iran, 2009-10) brief-report brief-report Background

HIV infection significantly increases the risk of tuberculosis and this disease is one of the most common opportunistic infections in HIV Patients.

Objectives

The aim of this study was to determine of the prevalence of tuberculosis and risk factor among HIV patients.

Materials and Methods

In this cross-sectional study, from September 2009 to September 2010, 71 HIV patients who referred to teaching hospital in Tehran, Capital Iran were enrolled. Records of patients that admitted to hospital at least once a year and have positive test for HIV with ELISA and Western Blot were assessed. TB diagnosis testes included clinical finding, chest X-Ray and culture positive sputum.

Results

74.6 % and 38 % of them had prison history and history of addiction respectively, 28.2% of subjects co- infected with HIV / TB and 40% of patients were under treatment with anti-retroviral drugs. There was relationship Between TB and CD4 counts below 200 cells per micro-liters (P = 0.003), age (P = 0.000), anti-retroviral drugs (P = 0.001), discharge status (P = 0.004), prison history (P = 0.002) and alcohol and smoking (P = 0.01).

Conclusions

The prevalence rate of TB / HIV among intravenous drug abusers and prisoners was high also the prevalence of tuberculosis among HIV patients.

Background

HIV infection significantly increases the risk of tuberculosis and this disease is one of the most common opportunistic infections in HIV Patients.

Objectives

The aim of this study was to determine of the prevalence of tuberculosis and risk factor among HIV patients.

Materials and Methods

In this cross-sectional study, from September 2009 to September 2010, 71 HIV patients who referred to teaching hospital in Tehran, Capital Iran were enrolled. Records of patients that admitted to hospital at least once a year and have positive test for HIV with ELISA and Western Blot were assessed. TB diagnosis testes included clinical finding, chest X-Ray and culture positive sputum.

Results

74.6 % and 38 % of them had prison history and history of addiction respectively, 28.2% of subjects co- infected with HIV / TB and 40% of patients were under treatment with anti-retroviral drugs. There was relationship Between TB and CD4 counts below 200 cells per micro-liters (P = 0.003), age (P = 0.000), anti-retroviral drugs (P = 0.001), discharge status (P = 0.004), prison history (P = 0.002) and alcohol and smoking (P = 0.01).

Conclusions

The prevalence rate of TB / HIV among intravenous drug abusers and prisoners was high also the prevalence of tuberculosis among HIV patients.

HIV; Tuberculosis; Prevalence; Coinfection HIV; Tuberculosis; Prevalence; Coinfection 58 61 http://www.ircmj.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=4401 Narmela Rabirad Narmela Rabirad Department of Infection Control, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Department of Infection Control, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Esmaeil Mohammad Nejad Esmaeil Mohammad Nejad Fmrsvtomoron N~syngoawmrom|mna}ro{ans|, Sou|idesoiowivi W~mversity of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-2166936626, asreno1358@yahoo.com; Fmrsvtomoron N~syngoawmrom|mna}ro{ans|, Sou|idesoiowivi W~mversity of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-2166936626, asreno1358@yahoo.com Fmrsvtomoron N~syngoawmrom|mna}ro{ans|, Sou|idesoiowivi W~mversity of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-2166936626, asreno1358@yahoo.com; Fmrsvtomoron N~syngoawmrom|mna}ro{ans|, Sou|idesoiowivi W~mversity of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-2166936626, asreno1358@yahoo.com Mohammad Reza Hadizadeh Mohammad Reza Hadizadeh Department of Infectious, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Department of Infectious, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Jamaloddin Begjan Jamaloddin Begjan Department of Nursing, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Department of Nursing, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Seyyedeh Roghayeh Ehsani Seyyedeh Roghayeh Ehsani Department of Nursing, Imam Khomeini Clinical and Hospital Complex, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Department of Nursing, Imam Khomeini Clinical and Hospital Complex, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran
en 10.5812/ircmj.3672 Serum Homocystein Level in Patients With Scleroderma Serum Homocystein Level in Patients With Scleroderma brief-report brief-report Background

Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) is a systemic connective tissue disease. In this study, we compared the serum Homocystein (Hcy) level between patients with SSc and normal control group.

Objectives

The current study was conducted to determine whether serum Hcy levels are elevated in SSc patients and whether there is any correlation between Hcy levels and RP, Gastro intestinal and lung involvement.

Patients and Methods

Forty one patients who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for SSc (39 females and 5 males) and Forty four community-based healthy individuals (sex and age matched) were enrolled in to the study. Serum Hcy, vitamin B12, and folate levels were determined.

Results

Thirty three patients (70.45%) had GI involvement, twenty two patients (50%) had lung involvement and twenty seven patients (61.36%) had Raynaud’s phenomena. Mean serum Hcy level in control group was 22.78 ± 6.018 μmol/L and in case group was 19.43 ± 7.205 μmol/L, shows that the serum Hcy level in control group was significantly higher than patients (P = 0.020).

Conclusions

Serum Hcy level is significantly lower in SSc patients than in control group. There is no statistically significant correlation between serum Hcy level and organ involvements.

Background

Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) is a systemic connective tissue disease. In this study, we compared the serum Homocystein (Hcy) level between patients with SSc and normal control group.

Objectives

The current study was conducted to determine whether serum Hcy levels are elevated in SSc patients and whether there is any correlation between Hcy levels and RP, Gastro intestinal and lung involvement.

Patients and Methods

Forty one patients who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for SSc (39 females and 5 males) and Forty four community-based healthy individuals (sex and age matched) were enrolled in to the study. Serum Hcy, vitamin B12, and folate levels were determined.

Results

Thirty three patients (70.45%) had GI involvement, twenty two patients (50%) had lung involvement and twenty seven patients (61.36%) had Raynaud’s phenomena. Mean serum Hcy level in control group was 22.78 ± 6.018 μmol/L and in case group was 19.43 ± 7.205 μmol/L, shows that the serum Hcy level in control group was significantly higher than patients (P = 0.020).

Conclusions

Serum Hcy level is significantly lower in SSc patients than in control group. There is no statistically significant correlation between serum Hcy level and organ involvements.

Scleroderma, Systemic; Homocysteine; Autoimmunity; Raynauds Disease Scleroderma, Systemic; Homocysteine; Autoimmunity; Raynauds Disease 29 31 http://www.ircmj.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=3672 Mohammadali Nazarinia Mohammadali Nazarinia Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-7112296072 , nazariniam@sums.ac.ir ; Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-7112296072 , nazariniam@sums.ac.ir Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-7112296072 , nazariniam@sums.ac.ir ; Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-7112296072 , nazariniam@sums.ac.ir Mesbah Shams Mesbah Shams Endocrine and metabolism research center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Endocrine and metabolism research center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Eskandar Kamali Sarvestani Eskandar Kamali Sarvestani Autoimmune Disease Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Autoimmune Disease Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Saeede Shenavande Saeede Shenavande Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-7112296072 , nazariniam@sums.ac.ir Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-7112296072 , nazariniam@sums.ac.ir Maryam Khademalhosseini Maryam Khademalhosseini Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-7112296072 , nazariniam@sums.ac.ir Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-7112296072 , nazariniam@sums.ac.ir Zeinab Khademalhosseini Zeinab Khademalhosseini Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-7112296072 , nazariniam@sums.ac.ir Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-7112296072 , nazariniam@sums.ac.ir
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